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IRLF 





THE 



Old Sixth Regiment, 



ITS 



WAR RECORD, 1861-5, 



BY 



CHARLES K. CADWELL, 



Late Sergeant of Co. F. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN., 1875. 



NEW HAVEN: 

TUTTLE, MOREHOUSE & TAYLOR, PRINTERS. 
1875. 



TO 
THE LOYAL WOMEN, 

WHOSE 

HUSBANDS, BROTHERS AND FRIENDS 

CAST THEIR LOT WITH THE OLD SIXTH 

IN 
DEFENCE OF THE FLAG, 

THIS MEMORIAL OF PATRIOTIC SERVICE IS RESPECTFULLY 
INSCRIBED 



Q\,mfj0r. 



INTRODUCTORY. 



The object of this work is to give a true and impartial record 
of the old Sixth Regiment during the war. The author collected 
the facts from a private diary kept by himself while in the service. 
Less has been known of the Sixth by our citizens than most of 
the other regiments ; perhaps this is due partly to the fact that 
when we arrived. in Washington Colonel Chatfield instructed 
officers and men that it was unmilitary to write letters for the 
press ; he desired that the War Record should know the record 
of the Sixth, and not the newspapers only. Its history is less full 
on this account ; yet none can say that the record of the Sixth is 
sullied. In many trying places the regiment proved itself honor 
ably and gained confidence from its corps and department com 
manders. 

There may be errors in this work, and if any are inclined to 
censure, I trust they will remember that very few histories are 
without them ; yet they are errors of the head and not of the heart. 
If what is here written meets the approval of the old members and 
the intelligent readers in general, I shall feel that my labors have 
been amply rewarded. 



M205562 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

In camp at New Haven. Fall in for rations. Uncle Sam s 
"Tanyards." Squad drills. An old man s blessing. 

CHAPTER II. 

Off for the conflict. Reception at Philadelphia. Through Balti 
more at night. Cattle cars to Washington. " Soldiers Retreat" 
in Washington. Fat pork and muddy coffee. Visit the Capitol. 
Camp at Meridian Hill. At Annapolis, Md. Embark on an 
Expedition. Terrible storm at sea. Incidents, &c. 

CHAPTER III. 

In Port Royal harbor. The ball opens. First naval engagement 
of the war. Forts Walker and Beauregard. Union fleet bom 
bard the rebels. Complete rout of the enemy. Triumphant 
victory for the Union. Great enthusiasm. Connecticut lands 
the first troops. Terrible scenes on land. Rebel pigs and 
chickens. Uncle Sam s rations at a discount. Warsaw Sound, 
Ga. "Greybacks accumulate." "Sketch for special artist." 
Spotted fever. Deaths daily The old Sixth unfit for duty. 



Contents. 5 

Ordered to Hilton Head. Dawfuski Island Camp. Jones 
Island on Savannah river. Fort Vulcan built of mud. Yankee 
ingenuity and cunning displayed. High tides, &c. 

CHAPTER IV. 

Capture cf Fort Pulaski. Heavy bombardment. Back to Daw 
fuski Island. North Edisto Island blackberries help Uncle 
Sam s pork to digest. Across John s Island. Col. Chatfield s 
speech, victory or death. Tedious rain. Guerillas cut off our 
supplies. Three days without food. 50 cents for a "hard 
tack." Arrive at Legareville on the Stono river. Cook rations. 
Across the river to James Island. Tom Grimball s Planta 
tion. Rebel advance. Battle of Secessionville. Evacuation 
of James Island. Go to Beaufort. Band of the Sixth mustered 
out. Expedition to Mackay s point. Battle of Pocotaligo. 
Col. Chatfield and Lieut. Col. Speidel wounded. Whole com 
mand return to Hilton Head. The Sixth at Beaufort. Death 
of our department commander Maj. Gen. Mitchell. 

CHAPTER V. 

Off for Florida. Land at Jacksonville. Occupy houses instead 
of tents. Skirmish with the enemy. Streets barricaded to 
prevent incursions of the rebel cavalry. Sermon by Rev. Mr. 
French. Evacuation of Jacksonville by Union troops. Town 
fired by the 8th Maine and a colored regiment. Back to Beau 
fort. Thirty-five hours in the town. Embark again a fizzle. 
Back to Hilton Head. Off again ; land at Folly Island. 
Battery building at night. Speak in whispers. Up Folly river. 
Capture of the southern portion of Morris Island. Brilliant 
charge of the Sixth. Capture a rebel flag. Assault on Fort 



Contents. 

Wagner. Terrible scene at night. Awful carnage. Col. Chat- 
field twice wounded. Union force repulsed. The ranks of the 
Sixth terribly shattered. Ordered to Hilton Head. Death of 
Col. Chatfield. 



CHAPTER VI. 

Our new Colonel. Great dissatisfaction thereby. Part of the 
Sixth re-enlist. Deserters shot. Death of Captain Allen. 
Up to Virginia under Butler. Ascend the James river. Ber 
muda Hundred. Skirmish with the enemy. Battle of Chester 
Station. Death of Captain Wilcox. Advance on Drury s Bluff. 
One of Butler s " masterly movements." Battle of Drury s 
Bluff. Union forces " change front to the rear." Resignation 
of our new Colonel. Appointment of Captain Rockwell as 
Colonel of the Sixth. President Lincoln rides by. " What 
mean those cheers." Battle of Strawberry Plains. Hancock s 
works. Battle of Deep Run. In holes around Petersburg. 
Discharge of the non re-enlisted men. Their reception in 
New Haven. 



CHAPTER VII. 

Around Petersburg. Advance toward Richmond. Attack on 
Battery Harrison. Draft riots in New York. The Sixth ordere* 
there until after election. Back again to Virginia. Embark on 
expedition down the James. Capture of Fort Fisher. Advance 
on Wilmington. Skirmishing with the "Johnnies." Enemy 
driven across North East river. At Goldsboro, N. C. Sur 
render of Lee s army. Muster out of the Veteran Sixth at 
New Haven. 



Contents. 7 

APPENDIX. 

Association of the Old Sixth meet in New Haven in May, 1868. 
Its object. Permanent organization effected. Choice of offi 
cers. Yearly reunions, their character, &c. Pleasant occa 
sions. 

ROSTER OF THE OLD REGIMENT. 

Names of officers. Residence. Date of muster. General re 
marks. Names of enlisted men. Substitutes and drafted. 
Date of muster. Residence. General remarks concerning all. 
Unassigned recruits. 

ROLL OF HONOR. 
CASUALTIES OF THE SIXTH. 



8 Engagements. 



PRINCIPAL ENGAGEMENTS. 



Hilton Head, S. C., November 7, 1861. 
Pocotaligo, S. C., October 22, 1862. 
James Island, S. C., June 10, 1862. 
Secessionville, S. C., June 16, 1862. 
Jacksonville, Florida, March 20, 1863. 
Morris Island, S. C., July 10, 1863. 
Fort Wagner, S. C., July 18, 1863. 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 6, 1864. 
Chester Station, Va., May 10, 1864. 
Drury s Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864. 
Strawberry Plains, Va., August 14, 1864. 
Deep Run, Va., August 15, 1864. 
Fort Fisher, N. C., January 14, 1864. 



THE 



SIXTH REGIMENT, 

CONNECTICUT VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



CHAPTER I. 

Early Spring in the year 1861, was an eventful one 
in American history. Troops were organizing in all 
the loyal States to go forth and suppress the unequal 
war that was waged upon the people of the North. 
Deeply was it overshadowing our land and threaten 
ing to destroy our liberties as a nation. The shot 
against Sumpter s wall was the key note of the Re 
bellion, and its echo was heard in every town and 
hamlet, uniting all loyal hearts and inspiring all the 
people with a zeal which had hitherto remained dor 
mant a zeal to avenge the insult offered to our flag 
and to vindicate the nation s honor. Traitors had 
been arrogant in our land and had openly defied any 
power of the national government to suppress their 
actions, but the shot from Charleston directed against 



ia Sixth Connecticut 

a federal fort aroused the people to a stern sense of 
duty. The call for brave men was nobly responded 
to, and regiment after regiment took their place in 
line, and in due time was off for the conflict. The 
disaster that befell the three months troops in the 
memorable Bull Run campaign, is widely known and 
needs no repetition here. Then the call for three 
years men was issued and again the ranks of the 
army were rapidly filled. None heeded the call with 
greater alacrity than the men who composed the 
members of the Sixth Regiment. A finer regiment 
or a more patriotic one, I venture to say, never en 
tered the Union army ; and that they maintained the 
honor of the State of Connecticut and reflected credit 
on their organization, subsequent events will prove. 
The Sixth was sworn into the State service on the 
3d of September, in camp at Oyster Point, New 
Haven, and on the i2th of the same month Uncle 
Sam made us secure for three years or the war. The 
ranks of the Sixth were filled with men who repre 
sented almost every avocation in life. There were to 
be found professional men, others who had made 
science a study, as well as a number who were skilled 
mechanics in those higher grades of industry. The 
merchant left his counting room, the student his 
books, the mechanic his workshop, the farmer his 
plow, and stood shoulder to shoulder in the ranks for 
the one grand object the suppression of the Rebellion 



Volunteer Infantry. n 

and the restoration of the old flag. The field officers 
of the Sixth, with one exception, had already been 
baptized with fire, and quite a large number of the 
rank and file had seen active service in the three 
months campaign. John L. Chatfield of Waterbury 
was commissioned as Colonel; Wm. G. Ely of Nor 
wich, Lieut. Colonel ; John Speidel of Bridgeport, as 
Major. 

The first company that reported on the ground was 
from Windham County Thomas K. Bates of Brook 
lyn, Conn., as Captain. Three companies were fur 
nished from New Haven, viz : Company "C," Capt. 
Daniel Klein ; Company " F," Captain Lewis C. 
Allen, Jr.; Company " K," Captain Henry G. Gerrish. 
Company " B," Captain Benjamin F. Prouty, was 
from Hartford and the adjoining towns. Company 
" D," Captain Lorenzo Meeker, was recruited princi 
pally from Stamford and Greenwich. Waterbury 
and the towns along the Naugatuck Valley furnished 
the members of Company " E," Captain Edward P. 
Hudson. Company " G," Captain John N. Tracy, 
was mainly from New Britain. Company " H," 
Captain Henry Biebel, was called a Bridgeport com 
pany, although most of the members were recruited 
in towns and cities north of New Haven. Company 
" I," Captain Thomas Boudren, was from Bridgeport, 
yet the adjoining towns contributed largely to her 
quota. 



12 Sixth Connecticut 

The companies, although formed under each letter, 
were not full when they reported in camp, yet recruits 
rapidly arriving soon swelled the ranks to the maxi 
mum number. The camp at Oyster Point was but 
the primary school that was to fit us for the more 
stern duties of the field, and very little care was 
bestowed upon our future movements, nor did we 
deem it wise to dwell upon the hardships of the 
soldier s life when in the enemy s country. We had 
some faint ideas of what might be, and while we 
could exclude these thoughts from our minds we 
considered it best to do so, knowing full well that 
trials would come soon enough. Our duties in camp 
were not arduous, and we patrolled our " beat " with 
unloaded muskets and kept a vigilant watch over the 
commissary stores at night, exercising as much care 
as in guarding the outposts in an enemy s land. We 
would occasionally glance at the future and try to 
study its mysteries. There was considerable pleas 
ure in the camp of the old Sixth, as well as its 
sorrows, and the time was well occupied in various 
ways and the days glided swiftly by. Friends were 
not wanting 1 to regale our palates with choice food to 
supercede the rations of Uncle Sam, and to ply all 
manner of questions regarding our general health 
and condition. Such questions as " Did we sleep on 
feather beds ?" and " We surely could not be expected 
to keep awake all night on guard?" and Don t they 



Volunteer Infantry. 13 

furnish butter on bread and milk in coffee?" All 
these questions met with a ready response, and we 
informed our careful friends that there was nothing 
like getting used to these things, and Uncle Sam 
would not probably see us suffer while so many 
patriots wanted a contract to furnish supplies. Our 
drilling was not very proficient during the first few 
days of camp life, from the fact that the camp was 
filled every day with the friends of the regiment, and 
the soldiers not having their uniforms, it was rather 
hard to determine who were enlisted in the service 
and who were the visitors. It is nothing detrimental 
to say that perhaps we " smelt the battle afar off," 
and anticipated a succession of drills when we were 
removed from our friends and the pleasant scenes 
that surrounded us in New Haven. But after we 
received our uniforms and rifles, which was a few 
days before our departure, it gave a new impetus. 
Then the boys began to feel that they were really 
soldiers. We would don the army blue, and with a 
pair of Uncle Sam s brogans upon our feet, the boys 
would respond to the order to "fall in." with great 
alacrity ; and then such a tramp with the " tan-yards " 
upon the parade ground was a sight amusing to 
behold ; and woe be to that individual who had corns 
upon his feet when such a piece of sole leather hap 
pened to light upon them. Under the efficient leader 
ship of our beloved Colonel, a brief period sufficed 



i^ Sixth Connecticut 

to acquaint us with a soldier s varied duties. Each 
soldier received from Uncle Sam the usual equipment 
of kitchen utensils, which consisted of tin cup and 
plate, together with a knife, fork and spoon, and the 
men require no drilling to learn their use. If the 
order to capture a rebel fort was responded to with 
as much speed as the boys obeyed the call to "fall in 
for rations," the cause of the Union would not suffer 
defeat at the hands of its defenders. 

But all things have an end, and so it was with our 
pleasant camp at Oyster Point. After receiving the 
usual articles necessary for transportation, we re 
ceived our marching orders. There was the usual 
bustle and excitement incident to breaking up a 
camp of soldiers, and each one felt that the time for 
parting with friends had come. Friendly greetings 
were heard on every hand. Many hearty hand-shakes 
and " God bless you," were given with a will, and not 
a few were bathed in tears as the last good-bye was 
said. Many fond parents bade farewell to sons for 
the last time on earth. Lovers greeted those whose 
ties of affection and sympathy endeared them to each 
other, and fondly cherished the hope that they would 
meet again when the war was over. Our city fathers 
were not lacking in their praise at our soldierly bear 
ing, and extended a prayerful wish for a speedy and 
triumphant return to our home and loved ones. 
One good old man, the Hon. James Brewster, from 



Volunteer Infantry. 15 

whose name Company "F" Was called Brewster 
Rifles, appeared in camp to the company he was so 
endeared to, and made them a speech, recounting the 
hardships and perils of a soldier s life, and expressing 
a wish to hear a good report from Company " F." 
As we gazed upon the venerable aspect of this good 
man, whose counsel and judgment were entitled to so 
much respect, we could not but inwardly resolve that 
our best efforts should be put forth in defense of the 
sacred liberties which had been such a strong bul 
wark to our nation. Many were affected to tears 
during his address, and I doubt not the memory of 
that hour made a lasting impression on many hearts 
present as he closed with an old man s blessing. 



16 Sixth Connecticut 



CHAPTER II. 

Tuesday, Sept. 17, was ushered in by a warm sun 
and a genial atmosphere, which only served to in 
crease our interest in the busy scenes that were before 
us, for we were all aware that the old Sixth would 
soon be en route for the seat of war. The colonel 
and staff were busy issuing orders, captains of com 
panies were instructed to issue no passes to leave 
camp, and so far as was practicable all visitors were 
excluded from the precincts of the camp proper. 
The cooks were busy preparing our rations, and 
every one seemed to think himself an important per 
sonage around the cook s tent. As the day wore on 
the clouds began to thicken, portending a storm, and 
as the call was sounded by the drummers at 2 o clock 
to "strike tents," the rain came down copiously. 
We rolled up the wet canvass as expeditiously as 
possible, which was quickly loaded on our army 
wagons, together with other camp equipage. 

We received two days rations for our haversacks, 
consisting of boiled ham and hard bread, to nourish 
the inner man, and were soon in line for our departure, 



Volunteer Infantry. 17 

but the usual delays incident to such an occasion 
kept us in line about three hours. 5 o clock came, 
and with it the order to "Forward, march." The 
band struck up "The gal I left behind me," and we 
marched through the rain and mud to Belle Dock. 
The rain did not dampen the ardor of the boys nor 
decrease the patriotism of the citizens of the Elm 
City. Handkerchiefs from fair ones waved us adieu ; 
men shouted " God bless the boys," together with 
the martial music of the band to increase the enthu 
siasm, made our departure from New Haven pleasant 
to contemplate. Pleasant, from the fact that we 
felt that the prayers and best wishes of our good 
people would go with us, as incentives to noble 
principles and holy action. We embarked on the 
steamer Elm City and soon stretched ourselves on 
the several decks and in the cabin, glad enough for a 
chance to rest ourselves, for the rain had drenched us 
through to the skin. The boat left her moorings at 
8 o clock, and when we awoke we found ourselves 
alongside the dock at Jersey City. For some un 
known reason we did not disembark till about noon. 
At 2 p. M. we left by rail for the capital of the nation. 
Arriving at Philadelphia we were entertained at the 
Union Refreshment Rooms with a bountiful collation, 
which was indeed refreshing to the inner man, and it 
also gave evidence of a large stock of loyalty on the 
part of the good people of that city. Every regiment 



i8 Sixth Connecticut 

passing through the city were made heartily welcome 
to their hospitality, and none will ever forget the 
hearty cheers and the " God speed " which was heard 
on every hand. 

Leaving Philadelphia, our next stopping place was 
at Perryville, where we arrived at 8 o clock in the 
evening. We were delayed here about two hours, 
and were then ferried across the river to Havre-de- 
Grace, when we again started by rail for Baltimore, 
arriving there at 10 p. M. No cheers for the Union 
soldier startled our ears at this place. No demon 
stration of delight at our arrival, but all seemed 
sullen, and their actions showed more of a secession 
spirit than otherwise. We were ordered to fix bay 
onets before we crossed the city, for the memory of 
the Massachusetts Sixth who had preceded us was 
not forgotten, and a repetition of those scenes would 
not have found us unprepared. The spilled blood of 
the Massachusetts Sixth will ever be a stain upon the 
records of the Monumental City while this generation 
inhabits this mundane sphere. 

We crossed the city to the depot where we found 
cars waiting to transport us to Washington. We 
were huddled aboard cars that we understood were 
used to transport cattle the day previous, and we had 
no reason to disbelieve the report, for the muck and 
filth covered the floors to such a depth that anything 
short of a pair of Uncle Sam s "tan-yards" would 



Volunteer Infantry. /<? 

have been lost sight of in a short time. However, 
we accepted the situation, believing that it all made 
up the three years of a soldier s life. We arrived 
in Washington on the i9th, at 6 o clock in the 
morning, very much fatigued by our wearisome ride 
in the cattle cars, wishing, longing, hoping, for what 
the soldier calls " a good square meal." We expected 
Washington would not be behind Philadelphia in 
this respect, and after stacking our arms and waiting 
patiently for about two hours our ears were startled 
by that sound so welcome to every soldier, " Fall in 
for rations." They marched us into a building hav 
ing a sign over the door reading " Soldiers Retreat." 
Visions of cold ham and soft bread appeared unto us, 
and that beverage, which always cheers but does not 
inebriate, we thought we smelt afar off; but alas, for 
a soldier s hopes. What a sight greeted our eyes as 
we filed into that building. Three long rows of 
tables, running the length of the building, were piled 
up with chunks of half boiled pork which looked as 
if they had been cut from the hog when just killed, 
for the bristles were long enough to lift up each piece 
by. A quantity of stale and musty bread and some 
very muddy coffee, completed our bill of fare. We 
had not anticipated such a re-treat as this ; however, 
we felt that it was nothing like getting used to these 
things, and we did retreat and got our breakfast at 
the eating houses. We had a few hours to see the 



2O Sixth Connecticut 

sights of the city, and improved them by a visit to 
the Capitol and House of Representatives, also the 
Senate chamber, where some of the boys sat down in 
the chair which Jeff. Davis had vacated, just to see how 
it would seem. Others made impromptu speeches 
on the great questions which were agitating our 
country. 

The camp which was assigned to us was out to 
Meridian Hill, about four miles from the capitol, and 
thither we marched and pitched our tents, and were 
quite willing to enjoy a comfortable snooze when the 
drums beat the tatoo. 

The Sixth was brigaded with the Fourth and Sev 
enth New Hampshire and the Seventh Connecticut, 
which arrived the next day, all under command of 
Brig. Gen. H. G. Wright. 

A member of Co. " B " was taken ill when but a 
few days in camp, and was removed to Columbia 
Hospital, where he died of congestion of the brain 
on the 26th of September. This was the first death 
since our organization. Death claimed another vic 
tim in a member of Co. " F," Theodore Gibbons by 
name. He died on the yth of October. 

The twenty days of our camp life in Washington 
was one unceasing drill : morning drills by the ser 
geants, before breakfast ; company drill after that 
meal was over ; then the brigade drill after dinner, 
taken with our other duties, made our time pretty 



Volunteer Infantry. 21 

much all occupied. We began to see in these extra 
duties the inner life of a soldier, and our proficiency 
in drill was manifest from day to day, yet as we heard 
of the clash of war and read the accounts of skir 
mishes, we longed to be at the front where we might 
participate in those stirring scenes. Several times 
during our camp life here, we were called into line 
and extra rounds of cartridges given us, w r ith the 
orders to hold ourselves in readiness to move at a 
moment s notice, but as often dismissed to await the 
next call. 

On the 8th day of October we left Washington by 
rail for Annapolis, Maryland, and arrived there after 
a wearisome ride of twelve hours. We were quar 
tered in the Navy Yard for a few days, which gave us 
an opportunity of seeing a few of the relics of the 
war of 1812. Many ancient looking swords, old flint 
lock muskets and wooden canteens were among the 
collection. A few days passed and we went outside 
the town and pitched our tents near a grove of fine 
old trees, where we might have better facilities for 
drilling, &c. We were inspected several times by 
prominent officers of the regular army, which gave 
evidence of some movement or other on foot, and a 
short time elapsed ere it was noised abroad that we 
were going on an expedition. 

The i9th of October found us all packed up and 
tramping up the gang-planks of the steamers to sail 

3 



22 Sixth Connecticut 

on the great expedition, with sealed orders, under 
Gen. Sherman. The right wing of our regiment was 
assigned to the steamship Marion, the left wing to 
the steamer Parkersburg. There were seventeen 
regiments in all, and thirty-three steam transports to 
hold us, besides quite a fleet of gunboats, made up 
the entire fleet. Such formidable looking boats pre 
sented to our vision, gave evidence of something 
else beside a mere excursion. We knew that hard 
work and fighting were before us and that only a few 
days would elapse ere we should see the rebel soil. 
Weighing anchor, we passed down the bay to 
Hampton Roads, Va., where we remained several 
days, waiting like Micawber, for something to turn 
up. Finally, the union jack gave the signal for sail 
ing, and glad enough were we at the prospect of soon 
being able to step on terra firma once more. Two 
days out from Hampton Roads we experienced a 
terrible storm at sea, and for several hours the pros 
pects of seeing anything but a broken wreck and 
finding a watery grave, were exceedingly dubious. 
Wave after wave poured over us. The hatches were 
fastened and everything on deck was lashed tight to 
prevent being washed away. The red glare of the 
lightning, with the terrific peals of thunder, made the 
scene awfully grand. Now in the trough of the sea 
and another moment upon the crest of the waves, 
with all on board terribly sea-sick, was a picture not 



Volunteer Infantry. 23 

very pleasant to dwell upon. Our fleet became scat 
tered and two vessels were sunk ; others had horses 
washed overboard ; while another was forced to 
throw into the deep her entire armament, which con 
sisted of some improved guns which we expected 
would do some very effective service. A merciful 
Providence permitted us to outride the storm and 
once more see the scattered fleet all together again, 
save those that went to the bottom. Many a prayer 
of thankfulness went up to God for our safe deliver 
ance from such a storm. 

A day or two of pleasant sailing brought us at 
anchor in the harbor of Port Royal, South Carolina, 
with two very formidable looking rebel batteries on 
either side of the harbor. Here we saw that our 
mission was to reduce these works and gain a foot 
hold on South Carolina soil. The rebel soldiers gazed 
at us from their strongholds, and two very scaly look 
ing gunboats ventured down from their hiding place a 
short distance above the batteries, and sent us their 
compliments in the shape of a few shells for about 
the space of half an hour, but with no damage to our 
fleet; but as soon as one of Uncle Sam s boats gave 
them a few messengers of war, they were glad enough 
to change front to the rear and troubled us no more 
that day. 



24 Sixth Connecticut 



CHAPTER III. 

The yth of November, 1861, will ever remain in 
the history of the war as one in which a grand victory 
perched upon the banner of the Union ; when treason 
and rebellion received a blow from which they never 
fully recovered. The members of the old Sixth will 
not soon forget the events that transpired. Our gun 
boats were occupied several hours in getting into 
position to do the most effective service, and after 
forming into a circle, with the grand old frigate 
Wabash taking the lead, they sailed around once and 
then opened fire upon those strongholds of rebellion. 
The enemy were evidently expecting something of 
the kind, for they returned the fire with great prompt 
ness. Fort Walker, on Hilton Head, seemed deter 
mined to drive the Union fleet away from the harbor, 
while Fort Beauregard, on Bay Point, which was 
opposite, played comparatively a small part, for all 
her shell fell short of the mark. As the boats moved 
nearer and nearer the engagement became more gen 
eral, and shot and shell flew like hail through the air ; 
those of the enemy doing little execution, while our 



Volunteer Infantry. 25 

shells seemed to stir up the sand around and in their 
batteries at almost every fire. The troops on the 
transports watched the engagement with intense in 
terest, while broadside after broadside were poured 
into those doomed works of treason. Orders were 
signalled to have the troops prepare, in light march 
ing order, to land at short notice. We were confident 
the battle would be short and decisive, as the rebels 
could not withstand such terrible odds. As the bat 
tle raged, our boats directed a part of their fire into 
the woods that skirted the shore on Hilton Head. 
What could that be for ? was the query ; when it was 
announced that the rebels were routed and were 
retreating through the woods ; and such we learned 
to be a fact, as they could easily be discerned by the 
glass, making their escape in that direction. A few 
more well-directed shots, and the firing ceased ; then 
we knew the victory was ours. A boat was lowered 
and manned by a picked crew of man-of-wars men, 
who pulled for the shore with great speed, landed and 
made their way into the fort on Hilton Head and 
raised the glorious stars and stripes on the rebel flag 
staff. Words cannot describe the events that followed 
in a few brief moments. The battle had been waged 
precisely five hours when the victory was announced. 
Liberty was triumphant over the despotism of slavery. 
The different bands on the steamers struck up the 
national airs, songs were sung, and cheer after cheer 

3* 



26 Sixth Connecticut 

rent the air from thousands of throats, while the loud 
huzzas swept through the fleet like a whirlwind, and 
not a few prayers arose to the God of battles for 
giving us such a signal victory. 

Thus was witnessed the first naval engagement of 
the war. Preparations were now made to land the 
troops, as it was feared the rebels would rally and 
contest the possession. The Connecticut troops were 
selected to land first, and the Sixth, with Lieut. Col. 
Ely in command, were put aboard the steamer Win- 
field Scott, while the Seventh, under Col. Terry, was 
in boats in tow of the steamer. The steamer ran as 
near the beach as she could, when we got into lighters 
and jumped into the swelling surf a cold bath for us 
at 10 o clock at night, with water up to armpits, our 
arms upstretched, with our rifles and cartridge boxes 
to "keep our powder dry;" but all were in good 
spirits and seemed willing to undergo any hardship 
to save the Union and the suppression of the infernal 
Rebellion. 

We took possession of the rebel works after we 
landed, without making any formal demand therefor, 
and not until we landed did we know what dreadful 
havoc our shells had made ; the sight beggars descrip 
tion. The dead and wounded lay in heaps, and the 
air resounded with groans and petitions for help. 
We built huge fires to dry ourselves, stationed our 
pickets and lay upon our arms, not daring to explore 



Volunteer Infantry. 27 

the island very far the first night, for fear of an am 
buscade. The night was spent without sleep, as we 
were thoroughly drenched through, and we were 
glad to hail the morning light. A detachment of 
three companies under Lieut. Col. Ely explored the 
lower part of the island, and met a few of the enemy 
who had not succeeded in getting away ; had a brisk 
skirmish with them, in which they retreated. The 
detachment brought into camp two fine brass how 
itzers, with a valuable pair of horses, besides seventy 
other horses, six mules, six wagons, two yoke of 
oxen, together with other valuable property of a 
total value of $50,000; but no credit was ever given 
us, not even a quartermaster s receipt. 

The island of Hilton Head was very rich and fer 
tile ; the cotton fields were ripe, waiting for the 
second picking. The palmetto tree was green and 
the air as balmy as June. Sweet potatoes were plenty, 
to be had for the digging. Every building near the 
fort was riddled by our shells, while the tents were 
torn into shreds. Our surgeons provided for the 
wounded as well as they could with the means at 
hand. Many of the dead were literally torn to atoms, 
and some w r ere half buried where they fell ; guns 
were dismounted, army wagons smashed, and many 
fine horses and mules lay in heaps. During the bom 
bardment, a rebel gunner, wearing a red shirt, was 
noticed by our fleet to occupy a very prominent 



28 Sixth Connecticut 

position on the parapet, and was seen to pat his gun 
every time he fired it, and we found one arm with a 
piece of red flannel upon it near the gun, which 
seemed to be all that was left of him ; he was evi 
dently blown to atoms. Those who succeeded in 
getting away alive must have beat a hasty retreat, for 
knapsacks, blankets and rifles lay in confusion all 
around, and were found at almost every step for 
miles through the woods. The armament of the fort 
was 22 heavy guns, most of which were rifled and of 
the most approved pattern ; and two heavy globe-sight 
rifled cannon, the gift of some neutral English friends 
to the Confederate States. 

For a short time Uncle Sam s rations were at a dis 
count, as the trophies of war in live stock seemed 
abundant. Pigs were roaming at will, only to be 
confiscated by a soldier ; chickens and geese were 
found in large numbers, and we regaled our palates 
with sweet potatoes, sugar cane, roast pig and broiled 
chickens. The commissary stores of the rebels were 
probably larger at this time than during the latter 
days of the confederacy. But after a while of sump 
tuous living, we were obliged to fall back on our 
regular salt junk and hard tack. 

After the stars and stripes, the State flag of Connec 
ticut was the first to wave over South Carolina soil, and 
the Connecticut troops made the first advance into 
the interior. 120 head of beef cattle, numerous pork- 



Volunteer Infantry. 29 

ers, large quantities of chickens and other fowls were 
brought in from the adjoining plantations in the days 
that followed, but these latter captures had to be 
turned over to the Quartermaster, except occasionally 
some fowl or porker that was slyly appropriated by a 
soldier for a " side dish " to accompany the junk and 
tack. We made frequent skirmishes over the island, 
but the foe had departed and the negroes were the 
sole occupants of the homes of their masters. The 
groves of orange trees at Seabrook s plantation were 
very fragrant, and the ripe fruit was quickly disposed 
of as contraband of war. We scouted out to the 
plantation owned by one Graham, which was about 
five miles from Hilton Head. There we found quite 
a village of negroes, who seemed pleased to see the 
" Yankees," as they termed us ; and on our inquiry as 
to the whereabouts of their masters, their reply was, 
"I dunno, massa ; dun gone for true dis time; spect 
him a right smart way off." The plantation of 
" Squire Pope," as the negroes called him, was a 
lovely place, indeed. The fine old southern mansion 
was situated in a large grove of live oak trees, with 
ample grounds neatly fenced. Large groves of orange 
trees, whose fragrance filled the air and gave evidence 
of the home of contentment and wealth, but the 
occupants had fled and left their household goods to 
the mercy of the soldiers. Two spacious libraries 
were in the house, filled with books. Heavy plate 



jo Sixth Connecticut 

glass mirrors and fine oil paintings adorned the 
walls, which, together with the rich furniture, made 
the place seem too good to be destroyed by the ruth 
less hand of war. 

Our forces were busily engaged in unloading the 
transports of their cargoes; piles of lumber were 
brought ashore and three large storehouses were 
erected on the island to hold Uncle Sam s rations; 
and everything indicated that Uncle Sam was to hold 
possession. Wheelbarrows, pickaxes and shovels 
were numerous, and we soon learned their use. A 
long line of earthworks was thrown up by the troops 
for protection from any advance that might be made. 
While we remained at Hilton Head we became very 
proficient with the shovel and pick, and for a time 
our rifles became rusty ; but the same could not be 
said of our shovels. 

The early months of winter, 1862-3, the Sixth re 
mained on the island, perfecting themselves in drill 
and awaiting orders ; and the 2oth of January found 
us with orders to embark on a secret expedition under 
Gen. Wright. We were hurried aboard of the steamer 
Cosmopolitan, a boat much too small to accommo 
date our regiment ; but we were informed that our 
stay aboard would be of brief duration perhaps 
only a day or two would elapse before we should 
land. We accepted the situation, as it all made up 
the three years of a soldier s life. A storm set in and 



Volunteer Infantry. ji 

kept the fleet in the harbor for nearly a week ; after 
which we weighed anchor and dropped down to 
Warsaw Sound, Ga., with the idea of avoiding Fort 
Pulaski and capturing Savannah by the way of an 
inlet. A long experiment was made by our gun 
boats, while the transports with the troops lay in 
Warsaw Sound. Commodore Tatnall, of the rebel 
navy, with his "mosquito fleet," as it was named, 
made several assaults on our gunboats, but was in 
variably compelled to withdraw without any advan 
tage gained. Our condition on shipboard was de 
plorable ; so cramped were we for room that when 
we lay on the decks at night one could not walk 
among the sleeping forms without stepping on a 
soldier. For sixteen days we were fed on salt pork 
and beef, and no vegetables, with hard tack that was 
full of vermin, and water that had been put in kero 
sene oil barrels three months before. The water was 
so thick in one barrel that the writer saw, it could be 
lifted up on the finger. It was so nauseating and 
foul that when poured into the sea, the water was 
discolored by it. We had no water to cleanse our 
bodies, save what the sea afforded, and salt water 
without soap is not very good to cleanse with. Dirt 
and filth prevailed to an alarming extent, and "gray- 
backs," as the boys called them, accumulated upon 
our bodies in a fearful manner. As one Dutchman 
expressed it, he had lice so big, " shust like wheat." 



j2 Sixth Connecticut 

None were exempt from these pests, from the Colonel 
down. So alarming was our condition that the whole 
brigade was ordered ashore that we might bathe and 
wash our clothes while the boats were fumigated. 
Scarcely had we landed ere the whole beach presented 
a ludicrous appearance a sight of which a " special 
artist " might envy that of a brigade of soldiers 
stripped to the waist, picking off these vermin. We 
remained ashore one day and then returned to our 
old quarters on board the ship, and in a short time 
were as filthy as ever. Severe sickness in the form of 
" spotted fever " broke out in the ranks of the Sixth 
in consequence, and became so aggravating that there 
was an average of four or five deaths daily. Large 
strong men were attacked in the morning and before 
night were dead. It baffled the skill of our surgeons, 
who worked with untiring zeal to break up this 
dread malady. Death seemed near at hand ; and to 
pass away by a foul disease contracted by being kept 
amid such filth was hard to contemplate. All ex 
pressed a desire rather to face all the guns of the 
rebel army than to meet death in this manner. 

A religious interest sprang up and prayer meetings 
were held in the cabins every evening. Many were 
converted and a large number professed Christ as 
their only hope. The Division Surgeon came on 
board and pronounced our condition as a very criti 
cal one, and said we must be sent back to Hilton 



Volunteer Infantry, 33 

Head to recruit; so back we went, although we 
would have preferred to go with the fleet if our quar 
ters had been suitable to stay in. News of our ill 
ness reached the Head before we did, and when we 
landed, there were none to bid us welcome ; all the 
soldiers kept at a safe distance. We pitched our 
camp on the old parade ground of the Ninth Maine 
Regiment, but no soldiers ventured near to greet us, 
as is usual on such occasions. One regiment sent us 
some coffee, bringing it as far as our camp guard and 
leaving it for us to take at our pleasure. 

Being once more on mother earth, with plenty of 
exercise and the facilities for keeping clean, the regi 
ment rapidly improved in health, deaths became less 
frequent, and we felt like ourselves once more. As 
soon as practicable we were detailed to work on the 
fortifications, and the pick and shovel were not al 
lowed to rust. The 2oth of March again found us 
under marching orders ; this time our destination 
was Dawfuskie Island. We embarked in the morn 
ing and landed at 10 o clock at night; marched 
through the woods to the end of the island opposite 
Fort Pulaski. A drenching rain made our march 
very wearisome, and we were glad enough to find a 
chance for rest a short time before daybreak. 

Dawfuski Island was a beautiful place. The groves 
of orange and fig trees were in blossom and their 
fragrance filled the air. The pomegranate and per- 



34 Sixth Connecticut 

simmon looked fine indeed, and the plantations were 
beautified with many choice flowers in full bloom. 
The Sixth made several reconnoissances up New 
River, toward Savannah, and watched the enemy in 
that direction. Part of our regiment was selected to 
occupy Jones Island, which was on the Savannah 
River, about midway between Fort Pulaski and the 
city. A few companies of the Forty-eighth New 
York Regiment had preceded us and were engaged 
in building a fort to prevent the enemy from rein 
forcing Pulaski. We built a. corduroy road across 
the island by laying several tiers of logs across each 
other; and it was with extreme difficulty we could 
gain a foothold, as the mud was so soft we would 
slip and go down knee deep into the mud. None but 
Connecticut Yankees would have thought it possible 
to fortify themselves in such a place. There was not a 
tree or shrub on the whole island ; nothing but tall 
rank sea grass. We pitched our tents in the mud ; 
banked them up with mud, and it was mud every 
where. At some of the high tides the entire island 
was covered with water to the depth of several inches. 
The writer has a vivid recollection of being awakened 
one night with the water surging into his ears, and 
we were all obliged to get up from our bed of sea 
grass and wait for the tide to recede, with no more 
sleep that night. The confederacy and its leaders did 
not receive very flattering compliments from the 



Volunteer Infantry. 35 

Union soldiers about this time, or the writer s ears 
deceived him. 

We managed, however, by excessive labor, to build 
a fort of mud, with the assistance of a few bags of 
sand which we got out of the river when the tide was 
low. The hot southern sun baked the mud quite 
hard as we piled it up, and by degrees we managed 
to get a foundation secure enough to mount nine 
heavy guns, which we drew across the island by night. 
The task was very laborious, and many gave way to 
fevers and other diseases, which made extra duty for 
those who managed to survive. Day after day we 
worked in mud and water up to our knees. The 
gnats and mosquitos were so thick we tied cloths 
around our heads to get a partial relief from the 
insects. Our water for cooking and drinking pur 
poses we got from the river; it was brackish and 
insipid enough, and many sighed for a cooling 
draught from the old oaken buckets of our northern 
homes. 



36 Sixth Connecticut 



CHAPTER IV. 

The batteries on Tybee Island being already very 
strongly entrenched (the mortars out of sight of the 
fort), everything appeared ready for the battle. 
The Seventh Connecticut was assigned the duty of 
serving at the mortar batteries and other troops were 
on duty at the rifled guns. The work before us 
seemed no easy task, considering the strength of the 
enemy. Fort Pulaski s walls were seven feet thick 
and mounted one tier of guns in embrasures and on 
en barbette. It was a huge five-sided fortress and was 
said to have been built by a Connecticut Yankee. 
Twenty guns, including ro-inch Columbiads, bore 
upon our batteries at Tybee, which had a decidedly 
unpleasant look. Col. Olmstead, the commander of 
Pulaski, was once more and for the last time invited 
to surrender; but he sternly refused by saying he was 
put there to defend the fort and not surrender it. 
Our batteries opened the ball at 8 o clock on the 
morning of the roth of April by a signal gun from 
battery Halleck. Simultaneously all the guns and 
mortars blazed away with such a deafening roar that 



Volunteer Infantry. jy 

the very island itself seemed to shake in its marshy 
anchorage. From that hour onward till the surren 
der, the artillery fire against the solid masonry of 
Pulaski s walls was terrific. The rebels replied vig 
orously and in a determined manner. The smoke 
was so dense that the sun was obscured. At a quar 
ter to eleven o clock the rebel flag-staff was shot away 
and the rebel rag tumbled down. This was hailed 
w^ith intense cheers and seemed to add new zeal to 
the soldiers who manned our guns. The distance 
between the combatants was at least a mile, yet it 
was very evident that nearly all our shots were tell 
ing. Our solid shot brought away great piles of 
masonry and clouds of brick dust filled the air. All 
day long an incessant fire was kept up, and at night 
the mortar batteries sent their compliments while the 
others ceased. At daylight the next morning the 
battle was resumed with its accustomed vigor, and in 
the early part of the forenoon a large breach was 
made in the walls. Guns were dismounted and seen 
to fall, yet the rebs seemed as tenacious as ever. Our 
gunners directed their fire toward the magazine of 
the fort in such well-directed shots that the rebels, 
fearing an explosion, hoisted the " white flag " at two 
o clock, April nth, and its appearance was greeted 
with the wildest enthusiasm. Cheer after cheer rent 
the air as victory had once more perched on our ban 
ners. The firing ceased, the smoke cleared away, and 



J& Sixth Connecticut 

then we saw plainly the great destruction our shells 
had made. The Seventh Connecticut had the honor 
of taking possession of the works and was also 
awarded the rebel flag. 

After the fall of the fort, Col. Chatfield was ordered 
to dismantle Fort Vulcan, on Jones Island, the bat- 
.tery of mud upon which we had worked with so much 
zeal. But, by some misunderstanding, our gunboats 
were drawn off, which left us in rather an unpleasant 
predicament, had the rebels chosen to come from 
Savannah and attack us. But Col. Chatfield was 
equal to any emergency, and with his usual foresight 
and calm self-possession, he dismounted the zo-inch 
columbiad in the night and floated it on a raft over 
to Pulaski, where it arrived safely the next day. In 
its place we mounted a black log with a barrel on 
one end. After our evacuation, Johnnie Reb sallied 
doAvn the river and captured the " Quaker." We re 
sumed our pleasant camping ground on Dawfuski 
Island, which was quite a pleasing contrast with that 
on Jones Island ; but the arduous labors imposed 
upon the Regiment for the past few weeks began to 
tell upon the men and patients at the hospital were 
numerous. 

We remained here drilling, and with our usual 
camp duties, till the last week in May, when we were 
ordered to report at Hilton Head, again embarking 
on that dreaded steamer Cosmopolitan, but did not 



Volunteer Infantry. 39 

remain on board very long this time, for, upon re 
porting to the General, we sailed for North Edisto 
Island, and arrived there in the evening of May 226.. 
Large quantities of blackberries were ripe in the 
field, and we found them very palatable and we 
thought they helped Uncle Sam s pork to digest. 
The Brigade under Gen. Wright was here reorganized 
and composed of the following troops : 6th Conn.; 
47th New York ; 55th and 97th Penn. Regiments. 
We here spent the time in brigade drills and the 
usual picket duties till the ist of June, when we 
crossed over to John s Island. We expected our des 
tination would be somewhere in the vicinity of 
Charleston, and were not disappointed. After march 
ing several miles we halted at a large sugar planta 
tion for rest. Col. Chatfield addressed us on our 
mission, and assured us we were marching on to vic 
tory or death, as we were going into the hot bed of 
rebeldom and undoubtedly would see some hard fight 
ing; but he was confident we would meet the issue 
with determined bravery, and he was to " lead us for 
ward." This last remark brought forth cheer after 
cheer for our gallant Colonel. The members of the 
Sixth felt justly proud of Col. Chatfield. 

Our march across John s Island was slow and 
tedious, as the guerillas infested us on all sides. Our 
cavalry scouts were ever on the alert, but, as the road 
was new to them the rebs used every advantage 



4O Sixth Connecticut 

against us. Our wagon trains were cut off and the 
command was without food for three days. Men 
offered 50 cents for a hard-tack. One soldier offered 
to eat a dog if it could be found. A body of cavalry 
moved to the rear and assisted greatly in dispersing 
the guerillas, and we were again rejoiced to see some 
salt junk. To add to our discomfort, a drenching 
rain storm set in which lasted three days, and while 
we were without tents or shelter of any kind except 
a gum blanket. To skirmish the woods through the 
briers and underbrush all day and lay on our arms at 
night with our clothes wet through and flesh all par 
boiled, was not very agreeable. We were not allowed 
to build a fire on any condition, as our near approach 
to the foe might discover our strength. When we 
arrived at the little village of Legareville, on the 
Stono River, opposite James Island, we found none to 
oppose us; all had fled. The poor shanties that com 
posed the village \vere the only dry wood available for 
fires; we concluded we would confiscate enough to 
dry our clothing and cook our pork. As we were 
now within sight of the Johnnies, no further seclu 
sion seemed necessary, for in a few days at least, we 
expected to "get together," and we knew we should 
have more zeal with a good square meal in our 
stomach and dry clothes upon our backs. Our chap 
lain counted eighty-three fires made on the ground, 
with an average of five cups to each fire, cooking 



Volunteer Infantry. 41 

pork, bacon and coffee. Col. Chatfield was assigned 
to the command of our Brigade, and on the evening 
of June 8th, he moved across the river to James 
Island, which is only about four and a half miles 
from Charleston. We rested for the night on Tom 
Grimball s plantation. The enemy attacked us the 
next night in our front, but were repulsed after a 
brisk skirmish of an hour s duration. The Connect 
icut battery was here, doing excellent service under 
Captain Rockwell, and the gun boats shelled the 
enemy over our heads, both of which proved valuable 
assistants to us. The Sixth held the advance picket 
line on the left for several days, and the rebels an 
noyed us exceedingly by sudden dashes through the 
woods upon our front, but we held our position 
firmly and repulsed every sortie made. Their sharp 
shooters, posted in trees and in places where they 
could see our position, very often shot down the 
picket without giving us a chance to fire back unless 
we fired at random. Gen. Wright remarked to his 
staff that he could rest quietly while the Sixth Con 
necticut held the advance ; he was not afraid of the 
picket line being deserted, as was the case with a 
Pennsylvania regiment who ran into camp in great 
haste one night, reporting the advance of the whole 
force of the Johnnies, when it was found that only 
a few of them had ventured near our lines to see 
what material Uncle Sam s boys were made of. Gen. 



42 Sixth Connecticut 

Wright promptly sent them back to their post, with 
orders to remain there till properly relieved. The 
pickets kept up their fire along the lines, and many 
were killed and wounded without extending the line 
on either side. 

The battle of Secessionville was fought the i6th of 
June. This was a small village north of Stono river, 
but was strongly entrenched outside. With Gen. 
Lamar s forces in the rifle-pits, a strong abatis in 
front, flanked by creeks and marshy ground and 
everything in their favor, the task seemed not an easy 
one to accomplish. Gen. Benham started his forces 
at daylight, and Avhen near enough to do any service, 
the command, which consisted of about 7,000 men, 
wheeled into line and the attack became general. 
The enemy poured a most galling fire into our forces 
and mowed down our men with fearful loss. The 
swampy ground making it impossible to form a line 
of battle, the forces were massed together, which im 
peded its progress as well as destroyed its efficiency. 
After several assaults, the forces were obliged to 
give up the contest and withdrew in good order, 
with nothing gained, but with a great sacrifice of 
life. The whole expedition seemed to have been 
shockingly managed. Ten thousand men were sent 
here on a five days march with about two days 
rations, and the plan of the battle reflected no credit 
upon the person who conceived it. It was reported 



Volunteer Infantry. 43 

in camp that it was a successful reconnoissance to 
find the exact position of the enemy, and, as the 
troops withdrew in good order, the second attack 
would prove victorious. But all soldiers are not de 
ceived by reports from headquarters. We well knew 
it was a defeat, with everything that word implied, 
and a second attempt would have resulted as disas 
trously as the first under the same leadership and 
plan of attack. Our loss in killed, wounded and 
missing footed up to 763. Only two companies of 
the Sixth were directly engaged. The other portion 
of the regiment was held in reserve. Had the enemy 
followed up their advantage they might have com 
pelled us to seek shelter under the banks of the 
river, but could have forced us no further, as the gun 
boats were a strong defence whenever an opportunity 
offered itself. The enemy shelled us pretty severely 
for several days after this, and we were constantly 
under arms, expecting an advance, but none was 
made. 

When Gen. Hunter arrived from the North he or 
dered an immediate evacuation of the island. The 
command moved at midnight across the island to 
Battery Point, where we leveled to the ground two 
of the enemies batteries which they had evacuated 
for a season, destroyed by fire a long bridge that 
spanned a river, and then embarked. The Sixth and 
Seventh Conn, went back to Edisto Island with Gen. 



44 Sixth Connecticut 

Wright, while the remaining forces were sent to 
other stations. Our stay on Edisto was a brief one 
of only two weeks duration, when we were called to 
Port Royal. After reporting at the latter place we 
were sent up to Beaufort. This little seaport town 
was once the summer resort for the chivalry. It con 
tained some very pretty houses, two medium-sized 
hotels, several churches and an arsenal; but how des 
olate in appearance now, not a white inhabitant of 
the town remained to greet us ; all had fled. The 
negro population welcomed the advance of the Union 
troops and gladly hailed the appearance of their de 
liverers. Brig. Gen. Brannon commanded the post 
here. We encamped in a fine grove of live oak trees 
that skirted the banks of the river and considered 
ourselves fortunate in getting such a pleasant place 
for our camp. The greater part of the summer 
months were inactive in this command. The forces 
settled down for the regular camp drill and disci 
pline. Each regiment took its turn at the ten days 
picket service, which -duty called them out to some 
fine plantations in the suburbs of the town. Here 
we enjoyed the life of the soldier. Our duties were 
not arduous and we had opportunity for reading and 
writing. The fields were filled with sweet potatoes 
and corn, together with the orange and fig trees 
which abounded near the houses, made our visits on 
this picket duty desirable. Our lines skirted the 



Volunteer Infantry. #j 

banks of the rivers and streams, with an occasional 
raid upon the main land in search of the Johnnies, 
These raids sometimes resulted in great captures, 
not of the rebs themselves but of their fowls. The 
Union soldiers did not want the fowls to lack or 
suffer hunger, and so confiscated them that they 
might not starve. Lieut. -Col. Ely left the regiment 
here at Beaufort, having been promoted to be Col 
onel of the Eighteenth Connecticut. During the in 
tense heat of the summer many fevers prevailed and 
a number sickened and died. Yellow jaundice pre 
vailed to a great extent. All seemed afflicted with it 
more or less, which was about as comfortable to en 
dure as sea-sickness. Capt. Gerrish, of Company 
" K," died on the ipth of August, of typhoid fever, 
after an illness of about three weeks ; his loss was 
deeply felt in the regiment. 

It was during our sojourn in Beaufort that orders 
were issued from Washington for the discharge of all 
regimental bands. The members of the Sixth deeply 
regretted the loss of their band ; it was such a com 
fort to hear the strains of music, and we felt that we 
could march better, yea, fight better, with the band to 
enliven the scenes that surrounded us ; but the order 
was peremptory and home they went, regretted by all. 

In the latter part of October an expedition was 
conceived by Maj. Gen. Mitchel, commanding the 
Department of the South, to proceed inland with a 

5 



46 Sixth Connecticut 

small force and burn the railroad bridges between 
Charleston and Savannah. Scouts had been sent out 
on several occasions to find the position of the ene 
my. A negro lent valuable assistance on one of these 
occasions, and the attempt at least seemed practicable. 
Sergt. Robert Wilson, of Co. " D," Sixth Connecticut, 
had been selected to pilot the raid, as his knowledge 
of the position of the enemy had been carefully 
gained by his recent daring scouts in their vicinity. 
Two brigades of troops under Brig. Gen. Brannan 
were selected for the occasion. The first brigade was 
led by Col. Chatfield, including his own regiment; 
the second brigade being led by Gen. Terry. The 
fleet consisted of nine gun boats, three transports, 
one schooner and two tugs. The Sixth was com 
manded by Lieut. Col. Speidel, a man noted for his 
bravery and his keen judgment and foresight. The 
fleet sailed on the afternoon of the 2ist of October, 
through Broad River, twenty miles from Port Royal, 
and the next morning at 7 a. m. we landed at a place 
called Mackay s Point, at Boyd s landing. Here the 
whole command rapidly disembarked and pushed 
forward. The first brigade led the advance, and the 
force, in column by companies, kept together as 
closely as the state of the road would permit. We 
passed many recently deserted plantations, pushing 
on over corn and cotton fields, through ditches and 
swamps for about five miles, when we discovered the 



Volunteer Infantry. 4.7 

enemy posted on a rising ground beyond a marsh and 
flanked by thick wood. They immediately opened 
upon us with a heavy fire of musketry and howitzers 
as we entered a large corn field, and our command 
quickly formed in line of battle and " went for them " 
pretty much the same as " Bill Nye went for the 
heathen Chinee." Haversacks and blankets were 
immediately thrown off and we were very soon hotly 
engaged. The rebs fled along the road before the 
second brigade was fairly on the ground. The first 
brigade entered the woods under a galling fire of 
grape and cannister. Here we found it difficult to 
proceed, as the underbrush was so thick we could 
scarcely stand upright, and all the w T hile subjected to 
a storm of bullets without a chance to make an effec 
tive return shot. We were ordered to fall back in 
the corn field while the skirmish line moved up the 
road. We soon cleared the woods of the enemy and 
again pushed forward through a deep morass, over 
ditches and through such thick briers that the blood 
oozed from our hands and faces. The jolly Jack Tars 
from the gun boats, led by the Middies, brought up 
several field pieces by means of drag ropes, and did 
very effective service in dislodging the enemy at this 
point. Here our regiment suffered severely. Col. 
Chatfield and Lieut. Col. Speidel were both struck 
with cannister shots while bravely leading the men. 
The old Sixth, as if to avenge the wrong, became 



48 Sixth Connecticut 

more desperate than ever and charged upon the 
Johnnies and drove them across the Pocotaligo river 
into the town bearing that name. They immediately 
fired the bridge to prevent our crossing, and the 
structure was rapidly consumed. The river being 
too deep to ford, we were obliged to remain on its 
banks Our object was to destroy the bridges over 
the Pocotaligo, Salketchi and Coosawatchie rivers, 
and cut the railroad at this point, in which we were 
partially successful. 

Col. Barton, of the 48th New York, landed at the 
mouth of the Coosawatchie river and proceeded in 
land to the railroad, where they encountered a train 
of cars loaded with rebel soldiers. They fired upon 
them, killing the engineer and also the color-bearer 
of the " Whippey Swamp Guard," and captured his 
flag. The 48th was obliged to fall back, as the rebels 
outnumbered them three to one, but made good their 
retreat without the loss of a man. The first brigade 
was engaged felling trees to bridge the river prepar 
atory to crossing, but the fire of the enemy was so 
deadly we were obliged to desist. During the lull a 
locomotive whistle was heard in the distance and a 
train of cars thundered into the village laden with 
rebel troops, which was received with cheers for 
"South Carolina." Late in the afternoon our am 
munition was spent and we were obliged to fall back. 
The Sixth Connecticut and 47th New Hampshire 



Volunteer Infantry. 4.9 

covered the retreat. Our return to Mackay s Point 
was slow and tedious, as we carried off all our 
wounded and gently laid out our dead, covering them 
as far as we could with the blankets of the soldier. 

The horrors of war were indeed sickening, as the 
rebels had every position in their favor and their fire 
was very destructive. Dead soldiers and horses lay 
in the woods as we passed ; broken gun carriages 
lined the road, and blankets, haversacks and rifles lay 
around the ground in large numbers. One sight 
which the writer witnessed gave evidence of true 
heroism. As the man-of-war s men filed down the 
road dragging their guns, one old Jack Tar who had 
lost his right leg and from which the blood was still 
oozing, was strapped upon his gun, while his com 
rades were gently cheering him up. As he passed 
our regiment he looked up with as cheerful a face as 
he could command, and, reaching out his arm, patted 
his gun as affectionately as one would a favorite 
child. Such heroism should not go unrewarded. 
Many of our command displayed unflinching courage, 
and the record of the Sixth Connecticut at this battle 
was indeed gratifying to its general officers. 

We had about 4500 troops engaged, composed of 
the following regiments : 6th Conn.; 4th New Hamp 
shire ; 47th and 55th Penn. regiments, in the first 
brigade under Col. Chatfield. The yth Conn., y6th 
Penn., 3d Rhode Island, and 3d New Hampshire, 

5* 



$o t Sixth Connecticut 

composed the second brigade under Brig. Gen. Terry, 
besides the Jack Tars from the frigate Wabash. The 
total loss to the whole command is not within my 
knowledge, but the Sixth suffered a loss of five killed, 
twenty-nine wounded and three missing. Orderly 
sergeant Robert B. Gage, of Co. " I," who displayed 
great bravery on the field, was killed by a rifle ball 
in the side. 

We arrived at Mackay s Point about eleven o clock 
at night, tired and footsore, and bivouacked on the 
banks of the river till morning, when we commenced 
to embark, which was completed at sunset, as the 
wounded were all brought in and tenderly cared 
for. We returned to our old camp at Beaufort, where 
we again settled down to the routine of drills, etc. 

On the 3oth of October our corps commander, 
Maj. Gen. Mitchel, died of yellow fever after an ill 
ness of a few days. The whole command mourned 
his loss as a brave and efficient general ; one who had 
endeared himself to the soldiers by his many good 
qualities of heart and his pleasing address. The 
funeral w r as attended in St. Helena church at Beau 
fort. It was quite an impressive scene. The Forty- 
seventh Pennsylvania regiment acted as escort and 
was followed by the First Massachusetts cavalry and 
four pieces of the regular battery, besides detach 
ments from all the other regiments in the command, 
the naval officers, headed by admiral Dupont, officers 



Volunteer Infantry. 57 

of the army on horseback, together with the agents 
of the government, made up the funeral cortege. 

During the winter months of 1862-3 tne Sixth re 
mained at Beaufort, steadily increasing in drill and 
guarding the island from attacks from the main land. 
While thus comparatively inactive the members cast 
about for something to relieve the dull monotony of 
the season, and it \vas resolved to form a society for 
our mutual improvement. Having obtained consent 
of our commander, the society called " The Young 
Men s Literary Association of the Sixth C. V." sprang 
into existence. The officers elected were : President, 
Timothy H. Eaton, of Co. "A;" Vice President, 
Robert McLavy, of Co. "E;" Secretary, James A. 
Wilson, of Co. "K;" Treasurer, Charles K. Cadwell, 
of Co. "F;" Executive Committee, Clark M. Loomis 
and Charles M. Morris, of Co. " F." We held many 
interesting debates in the Chapel tent on the leading 
questions of the day. As the society increased in 
membership we found our quarters much to small, 
and, by the consent of the commander of the post, 
we obtained permission to occupy one of the churches 
near our camp for our sole use, which we dedicated 
Chatfield Flail. This we fitted up as well as our lim 
ited means would allow, and, by the help of some of 
our generous officers, we added a small library. The 
society rapidly increased in interest, and members 
were admitted from other regiments, and many excit- 



j2 Sixth Connecticut 

ing debates, which would have reflected credit on the 
floor of Congress, were heard within this place. The 
Glee Club of the Sixth, composed of Benjamin 
Terrell, of Co. " F," sergeants Whiteley, Deming and 
Edward Yates, and corporal Cummings, of Co. " G," 
rendered some fine music on several occasions. Reg 
ular meetings for prayer and conference were also 
held, and many of these meetings were largely at 
tended, with gratifying results. Exhibitions of vari 
ous kinds were given by the boys, including arts 
of ventriloquism, negro minstrelsy, tableaux, &c. 
Thanksgiving day was spent in a variety of out-door 
sports, such as ball-playing, pitching quoits and run 
ning races ; and at the close of the day we had a 
" Mock dress Parade," in which privates acted as the 
general officers, being dressed as oddly as possible, 
some with only underclothes on, others with coats 
and pants turned inside out and with knapsacks un 
der their coats. All orders from the "Col." were 
obeyed directly opposite to the command. A large 
number of visitors were present and were convulsed 
with laughter at the proceedings, while the partici 
pants maintained as much decorum as when on a real 
parade. 

New Year s day, 1863, found us still at Beaufort, 
with the privilege of "half holiday." The day was 
beautiful and the ushering in of the new year was 
pleasantly greeted by all, with many a hope and 



Volunteer Infantry. jj 

prayer that we should soon see the close of the war. 
A variety of games were gotten up to make time pass 
pleasantly, the first of which was a target practice. 
The first prize of ten dollars was awarded to a private 
in Co. "A," the second best, a prize of five dollars, 
was awarded to a private of Co. " K." The jumping 
feats were next in order, with a large number to com 
pete. The prize of five dollars was awarded to Joel 
C. Osborn, of Co. "F." Following this came the 
"hop, skip and jump." Corporal Cummings, of Co. 
" G," jumped, hopped and skipped thirty-three feet 
and four inches, and was declared the winner of the 
first prize of five dollars. The second best, a prize 
of two dollars and a half, was given to a private of 
Co. "I." 

These exercises closed the pleasures of the fore 
noon. In the afternoon a running match was first in 
order, distance 150 yards; first prize, of five dollars, 
awarded to corporal Botts, of Co. " D ;" second prize, 
two dollars and a half, awarded to private Banty, Co. 
"D." The next on the programme was a target 
placed in the ground to be bored with an auger at 
twenty paces, blindfolded. The prize of five dollars 
was awarded to Orrin Lathrop, of Co. " F," he being 
the only competitor who touched the target at all. 
Next came the wheelbarrow races, distance 100 yards ; 
first prize, five dollars, awarded to private Duprey, of 
Co. "A." Nearly all the competitors went about a 



54 Sixth Connecticut 

hundred yards from the point in opposite directions. 
The sack races were the most laughable of all, as each 
contestant was completely enveloped in a sack, which 
made their progress over the ground very ludicrous 
to behold. Catching the greased pig and climbing 
the greased pole were other games resorted to and 
had many contestants. The day closed with another 
burlesque dress parade and a short review, which 
was a decided improvement on our last one, and 
caused much pleasure to the spectators, among whom 
were Gen. Brannan and staff and a large number of 
ladies. 

The Sixth spent a great deal of time on the sur 
rounding plantations on picket duty, at which places 
we were picketed for ten days at a time. Each com 
pany made certain plantations their headquarters, 
while every nook and ravine where the enemy were 
likely to attack was strongly guarded. For a time 
we found rebel chickens and pigs more palatable 
than hard tack and pork. The oranges and figs were 
not left to spoil upon the trees, and every sweet 
potato and corn field was visited for supplies. The 
rebel pickets at Port Royal Ferry were very com 
municative, and several times we exchanged papers 
with them. They seemed anxious to " barter " some 
thing with a Union soldier whenever an opportunity 
presented itself. Their stock in trade consisted 
chiefly of tobacco, which they would readily exchange 



Volunteer Infantry. 55 

for salt or coffee. They invariably deprecated the 
war and wished for its close. Several flags of truce 
came at this point for different objects, the bearers 
of which were clad in the poorest of homespun 
clothes and always had the appearance of half starved 
creatures ; long, lank, hollow-eyed, and hollow 
cheeks, with tangled hair and a saffron look in the 
face betokened the straits of the confederacy. Well 
might they wish for the war to close and "go hum," 
as they termed it, when they gazed on the compara 
tively well fed and well dressed soldier of the Union 
army. 



Sixth Connecticut 



CHAPTER V. 

The Sixth Connecticut Regiment left Beaufort on 
the evening of the i8th of March, bound down the 
coast. We passed several places of interest on our 
journey, among which were Mayport Mills, Fernan- 
cTina and Fort Clinch. Deserted plantations lined 
the banks of the river and everything had the appear 
ance of war s desolation. In trying to cross the bar 
and enter St. John s River we got aground, and after 
several ineffectual attempts, we finally succeeded by 
the aid of a tug-boat, and our destination, Jackson 
ville, was reached on the morning of the 2oth of 
March. One U. S. colored regiment were the only 
troops in the town. We did not pitch our tents here, 
but occupied the houses which had but recently been 
vacated. We found in many of the houses everything 
necessary for housekeeping, even to beds and bed 
ding. So hastily was the retreat of the chivalry from 
this place that many valuable household goods were 
among the trophies. Large quantities of eatables were 
found buried in stone pots, some quaint looking guns 
and almost every article needed for house use. Quite 



Volunteer Infantry. 57 

a number of families of rebel proclivities remained in 
the town, who were either unable to get away after 
we took possession, or else were unwilling to lose 
their household goods. We barricaded the streets 
and avenues leading out of the town by felling trees 
across the roads to prevent the incursions of the 
rebel cavalry which infested the woods back of the 
town. 

Jacksonville was once a watering place and home 
for invalids, and many of our northern people re 
sorted there during the months of winter to enjoy its 
salubrious climate. It must have been an inviting 
retreat in its palmiest days. Everything here seemed 
to have been laid out for comfort and convenience, 
unlike many places which we have visited. But alas ! 
how things had changed. Houses that were once the 
home of wealth and luxury were now the abodes of 
the Union soldier. Gardens laid out with the choicest 
flowers were trampled under foot by horses of our 
cavalry ; the stores were closed, the goods removed ; 
and business at a standstill. A few negroes lurked 
around the town, who were glad to get under cover 
of the Union arms. Co. " F " of the Sixth occupied 
the fine old mansion belonging to Col. Pierson of the 
rebel army, which was situated on the corner of 
Market and Duval streets, opposite the Episcopal 
Church. There many of the troops resorted and the 
organ was in constant use. 

6 



58 Sixth Connecticut 

The first Sabbath we spent in Jacksonville we 
attended service and listened to a very able discourse 
by the Rev. Mr. French; his subject was "The sword 
of the Lord and of Gideon." The church was densely 
crowded with white and black soldiers, navy and 
army officers and civilians. In the course of his 
remarks he alluded to the deserted city and why the 
inhabitants had left it, fearing their lives would be in 
danger if they remained till the so-called Yankees 
made their advent in their midst. He expressed him 
self quite well pleased with the conduct of the white 
troops, and especially the Sixth Connecticut. He 
said Gen. Hunter had selected the Sixth above all 
others to occupy this place and protect the remaining 
inhabitants from the lawlessness of the rebel cavalry. 
He assured us our position was not an enviable one, 
as we were in a bad place and the woods swarmed 
with rebel cavalry, waiting only their chance to sur 
prise us ; but he (the speaker) was confident that the 
enemy would not catch us napping, and when brought 
to the foe, would meet them with determined bravery. 
We were quite pleased with the speaker s allusion to 
our regiment, and he was personally thanked by 
many for the exalted opinion he entertained for us. 

The Eighth Maine regiment arrived here from 
Beaufort a few days after we took possession. The 
rebels frequently annoyed us by shelling the town 
with a gun which they had fastened to a railroad car, 



Volunteer Infantry. 59 

and would bring it as near the town as they dared on 
the track, and then shell us. Our gunboats were not 
slow to disperse them, however, and they were soon 
driven back. On one of these occasions a shell en 
tered a house (which the writer visited), passing 
through the bed-room in which a man and wife were 
sleeping, and in its course it passed through a stuffed- 
seat rocking chair on which lay the man s coat, cut 
ting off the skirts and forcing them through the back 
of the chair. The window glass were shattered and 
two looking glasses hanging in the room were broken, 
while the occupants of the bed were literally covered 
with plaster and splinters. The lady remarked to 
the writer that she was not partial to balls of that 
kind, and told him if he ever met Gen. Finnegan (the 
rebel commander), to present her compliments with 
the request that fish-balls would be more acceptable 
next time. 

We found ourselves busy each day in preventing 
the raids of the enemy, and several times were called 
up at night by the pickets being driven in. Our 
force was so small that an advance very far would 
have been with a great sacrifice of life for us, and our 
gunboats prevented a very long stay of the rebel 
troops in the town. We suffered no loss of life in 
our regiment while here ; a few were slightly wounded. 
An expedition of the negro troops went up the river 
as far as the town of Pilatki, where they surprised a 



60 Sixth Connecticut 

small force of rebels and captured 14 ; the rest fled in 
dismay, fearing a large force was at hand. They also 
captured some horses and about $3,000 worth of cot 
ton, which they brought away in safety. While on 
their way down the river the enemy fired upon them, 
wounding Lieut. Col. Billings of the First S. C. 
troops, a* ball passing through the palms of both his 
hands and another through his leg. 

On Sunday, the 29th of March, Gen. Hunter or 
dered the evacuation of Jacksonville by all the Union 
troops. The inhabitants begged permission to ac 
company the troops, as their lives were in danger as 
well as their property, if left at the mercy of the rebel 
troops. Their request was partially granted and they 
flocked in numbers to the transports with large quan 
tities of household goods, which so completely block 
aded the room that orders were issued to put the 
goods on the wharves again. Large numbers of 
negroes secreted themselves on board the boats, fear 
ing to be left behind. As we left the town an old 
lady appeared on the veranda of her house wringing 
her hands and sobbing as if her heart would break, 
doubtless sad at our departure. A large number of 
the houses and stores were set on fire just before we 
got on board the steamers, and as we left the wharves 
the larger part of the town was in flames and was 
probably destroyed. This wanton act of vandalism 
was charged upon the negro regiment, and they in 



Volunteer Infantry. 61 

turn said the Eighth Maine Regiment was to blame ; 
no doubt both of these regiments had something to 
do with its destruction. It was entirely unnecessary 
and uncalled for, and the wanton act of burning a 
town would not destroy the Rebellion nor reflect any 
credit upon those soldiers of the Union who fired it. 
Justice should overtake all, and severe punishment 
meted out to those who so far forget the bounds of 
propriety as to disgrace the honored cause in which 
they are engaged. 

We did not arrive at Beaufort as soon as we ex 
pected, owing to a heavy storm of wind and rain 
w r hich set in, and as our boats were old and so heavily 
laden it was not deemed prudent to venture outside 
in such a gale. The storm passed by and we reached 
our destination in safety on the morning of April ist. 
We pitched our tents, expecting to settle down again ; 
but the soldier has no abiding place in time of war, 
nor does he know one day where he will be the next. 
After thirty-five hours in Beaufort, we were oif again 
on another "excursion." 

The rumors in camp seemed to indicate that this 
time the expedition was to be more formidable than 
any previous ones, and this was true, as the sequel 
will eventually prove. Large numbers of troops 
were being put on board steamers at this place and at 
Hilton Head ; gunboats were active and all was bus 
tle and excitement. The wildest rumors prevailed as 

6* 



62 Sixth Connecticut 

to our destination ; some asserted that we were going 
to Virginia, while others claimed Charleston as the 
most probable place of attack. The Sixth embarked 
on the steamer Belvidere and steamed down to Hilton 
Head, where we lay for one day awaiting orders ; in 
the mean time troops were embarking and getting 
ready to sail. When all seemed ready, we were off 
for the conflict and came to anchor in Stono River, a 
little below the village of Legaresville. Here we 
found other troops had preceded us and were also 
waiting to land. The monitors and other gunboats 
were busily engaged up the river shelling the camps 
of the enemy. Two shots from the enemy came in 
rather too close proximity to our steamer for safety, 
and we hoisted anchor and dropped a distance down 
the river out of range. The gunboats were engaged 
nearly every day for a week in the direction of 
Charleston, while we remained on board ship await 
ing orders. Finally it was rumored that there was 
some trouble existing between some of our officers 
high in command, and that the whole force was to be 
withdrawn. The rumor proved correct. Admiral 
Dupont and Gen. Hunter disagreeing in the plan of 
the battle, it could no longer avail anything and the 
whole affair proved a fizzle. In the meantime Gen. 
Hunter was relieved and Maj. Gen. Gilmore appoint 
ed to command. Gen. Gilmore was well known for 
his engineering skill and also his military prowess- 



Volunteer Infantry. <5j 

The morning of April nth, the fleet withdrew to 
Hilton Head and reported, while the different regi 
ments were sent to various posts. The Sixth en 
camped at Hilton Head, just outside the breastworks, 
where we remained till the i8th of April, when we 
again embarked and sailed for North Edisto, arriving 
there the next morning and anchored in the stream 
close to the dock, but we did not land till the 26th, 
when we were put ashore on Botany Bay Island, 
which is near the Edisto. We were immediately 
ordered out on a scout of about seven miles, after the 
Johnnies ; but with the exception of passing a de 
serted cavalry camp we saw no evidence of the enemy. 
We returned to the landing and went on board the 
steamer, where we passed four more days, when we 
finally made a landing on Folly Island. The island 
was rightly named, fora man in civil life must indeed 
be a fool to think he could live on such a barren 
place ; but a soldier is expected to live anywhere 
where he is sent. The island is a long strip of land 
about three-quarters of a mile wide at the widest 
point, and about four miles long, lying immediately 
south of Morris Island, from which the northern 
point is separated by only a narrow stream called 
Lighthouse Inlet. The lower part of the island runs 
down to a sharp angle and is covered with a thick 
growth of pine and palmetto trees, while the upper 
part was a low, marshy swamp. With swarms of 



64 Sixth Connecticut 

sand fleas and mosquitoes for our constant compan 
ions, we pitched our camp on the sand hills; there 
could be no order or regularity to our company 
streets, for some tents were pitched on a hill, while 
others were in a valley. Our fatigue duty was quite 
arduous, as we were obliged to work nights, and had 
to maintain the utmost silence, speaking only in 
whispers. From the upper or northern portion of 
the island, where we built the batteries, we could see 
the Johnnies on Morris Island very plain ; but they 
little thought of the doom that was in store for them. 
They suspected no serious movement on our part, 
and did not think we had more than one field piece 
on the whole island. When we were obliged to fell 
trees we sawed them in two and lowered them gently 
to the ground by means of ropes. All the heavy can 
non were brought through the woods and mounted at 
night, and then masked by covering them with leaves 
and dirt. It was with the greatest secrecy that the 
work was pushed forward. The enemy saw none of 
our troops nearer than the woods except the picket 
line, and while we seemed idle by day, hundreds of 
shovels gleamed at night by willing hands, while 
battery after battery rose up, yet nothing was visible 
to the rebels. Huge mortars and parrot guns came 
from Hilton Head, landed at Stono Inlet and were 
dragged slowly and tediously to their place under 
cover of darkness. Ammunition was taken forward 



Volunteer Infantry. 65 

and concealed every night for over three weeks. 
The Sixth found its labors very severe. By moon 
light and during heavy thunder showers the work 
went steadily forward. At the end of that time, ten 
large batteries had been completed, mounting 48 
heavy guns and within 400 yards of the enemy s works. 

During the latter part of the time they began o; 
suspect something was going on, for we could see 
them strengthen their batteries on the opposite bank. 
The rebel pickets were very inquisitive and tried to 
question us regarding our position, &c. We were on 
good terms with each other, and made miniature ships, 
freighted them with salt and coffee, and sent them 
over to the rebs, and in return they sent us tobacco. 
They informed us of the death of " Stonewall " 
Jackson, and displayed their flags at half mast and 
fired half hour guns throughout the day in honor of 
the deceased. They generally communicated to us 
the news of any battle that occurred sooner than we 
got it through our own sources. They seemed to 
relish a joke occasionally. One of them informed us 
that Gen. Beauregard had such an exalted opinion of 
the "Yankees" on Folly Island that he was coming 
over to make us a visit and give us all a " farm six 
feet by two." 

About the ist of July large numbers of troops be 
gan to arrive at the island, and " old Folly " literally 
swarmed with them. The order was given for us to 



66 Sixth Connecticut 

capture the battery on the end of Morris Island, and 
we expected to make a night attack, so we sewed 
pieces of white cotton cloth on the left arm, that we 
might be distinguished from the foe. At midnight 
on the pth, large detachments of troops stepped 
quietly into boats and rowed silently up Folly River; 
not a word was spoken above a whisper, nor any 
noise heard, save the splashing of the oars and the 
occasional plunge of the alligators from the river 
bank. At about 3 o clock the flotilla of eighty large 
launches had arrived near Morris Island, and we 
were ordered to keep close to shore and under cover 
of the tall sea grass that lined its banks. Here we 
waited patiently for the dawn of day, a day that was 
to bring victory to our flag, but death to many a 
brave soldier. We could see from our position the 
rebel soldier lazily walking his beat on the parapet, 
while the smoke from the dim camp fires slowly 
ascended skyward. Everything indicated to us that 
they were not expecting cannon balls for breakfast 
nor the advent of the boys in blue. Gen. Strong, 
who was to lead the attack, looked every inch a sol 
dier, as he moved among us giving cheering words to 
all. At precisely 5 o clock, the batteries that we had 
worked on so faithfully for weeks, were unmasked to 
the enemy and opened simultaneously from 48 guns. 
The astonished rebels soon replied with great rapidity. 
As the ball opened, the inhabitants of Secessionville, 



Vohmteer Infantry. 6f 

on James Island, crowded to the roofs of the houses 
till they were black with them, to witness the battle. 
Our gunboats shelled the batteries with good effect, 
and the enemy discovering our position in the boats, 
scattered grape and cannister among us with fearful 
rapidity. There we lay in the boats for two hours 
under a heavy fire, while the rebels divided their 
compliments among us and the gunners at our bat 
teries. The batteries did not seem to have the de 
sired effect of dispersing the enemy, and Gen. Strong 
was signalled to land his forces and charge upon their 
works. The rebels perceiving the signal and inter 
preted its meaning, directed a galling fire at the boats. 
One boat of the Sixth was struck and a member of 
Co. " E " lost a leg which soon caused his death ; 
another was wounded and the boat overturned, but 
was soon righted by help from others and the men 
rescued. We pulled for the shore, eager to land, and 
while a detachment of the Seventh Connecticut 
landed first on the left of the rifle pits and were feel 
ing their way. The old Sixth sprang into the water 
knee deep and was soon directly in front of their 
battery; rushing forward with bayonets fixed and 
with an honest Union cheer. The rebels depressed 
their guns to rake us as we landed, but the shot 
struck the ground in front of us and passed over our 
heads, and the amazed rebels, seeing our determina 
tion, turned to flee just as we gained the first line of 



68 Sixth Connecticut 

works, but we were too quick for them, and the 
Sixth captured 125 prisoners and a rebel flag. Pri 
vate Roper Hounslow, of Co. " D," saw the bearer of 
the flag making for the rear as fast as his legs could 
carry him, when he ordered him to halt; but he 
would not, and he shot him through the head. The 
flag was inscribed " Pocolaligo, Oct. 22, 1862." It 
had blood stains upon it which were probably spilled 
at that place. Col. Chatfield waved the banner aloft, 
feeling very much elated to think we had captured 
the flag that bore this inscription, for he received a 
wound at Pocotaligo. Col. Chatfield led his men to 
the last range of rifle pits, which was within a rifle 
shot of Fort Wagner. The Sixth had the advance all 
day. Our flags were riddled with shell, and the staff" 
of the stars and stripes was broken in three different 
places. A rebel ramrod was substituted for the 
broken staff, and our flags floated from the only 
house on the island. This house was the headquar 
ters for the rebel officers, and when we entered it the 
coffee was in cups on the table and breakfast nearly 
ready ; but we did not stop to eat, as we were looking 
for water; and seeing the coffee, disposed of it in 
short meter. Two solid shot from Fort Wagner 
came tearing through the house, demolishing the 
chimney and scattering the bricks upon the tables in 
great confusion. We concluded that we might be 
demolished if we remained in there long, so went 



Volunteer Infantry. 69 

out ; the house being a good target, it was soon rid 
dled with shell from Forts Sumpter and Wagner. 

We remained at the front till about sunset, under 
a severe fire continually. Tired and footsore, with 
hardly anything to eat, and without sleep for three 
nights, we were glad when orders came for us to fall 
to the rear and another regiment to take our place. 
Gen. Strong was active all day and infused spirit 
into the soldiers by his commanding aspect. When 
we landed he was burdened with a pair of long mili 
tary boots upon his feet, and as we jumped into the 
water these became so full that locomotion was well 
nigh impossible, so he pulled them off and threw 
them away, going in his stockings. The briars over 
the sand hills soon wore the bottoms of these off, and 
having captured a rebel mule, got astride of him and 
went forward with a cheer from the soldiers. Soon 
after the battle he appeared among the members of 
the Sixth, still astride the mule, who looked jaded 
enough. " Boys," said he, " I don t look like a 
General, but you look and have acted like true sol 
diers," and immediately rode away, followed by the 
cheers of the soldiers. 

It was determined to assault Fort Wagner and cap 
ture it with the bayonet. The Seventh Connecticut 
was to lead the charge, supported by the Ninth Maine 
and Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania. Early on the morn 
ing of the nth, before the lark was awake, this com- 

7 



jo Sixth Connecticut 

mand silently moved forward, drove in the rebel 
pickets and with a cheer rushed into the ditch and up 
the parapet, but met a very stubborn foe, who poured 
grape and cannister into their ranks. The Ninth 
Maine, instead of supporting them, wavered, at such 
a fearful fire, and ran away, while the Seventy-sixth 
Pennsylvania stood their ground. But the battle was 
against fearful odds, and they were obliged to retire 
and give up the contest. The Sixth lay all night in the 
rifle pits before Wagner, in a drenching rain, keeping 
a sharp look out for any surprise. On the morning 
of the i8th they came into camp wet and covered 
with sand, weary enough to lay up for a rest ; but 
there is no rest for the soldier in time of war. 
Scarcely had we brushed off the sand and got a bite 
of pork and crackers before we were ordered to join 
in the assault on Wagner at dark. Never was an 
order more cheerfully obeyed, especially as the word 
passed around that Col. Chatfield was to lead us into 
action, the Colonel declaring his preference "to 
stand or fall with the men of the Sixth," and refusing 
the honor of commanding our brigade, which be 
longed to him as the ranking officer. The gunboats 
shelled the rebel fort incessantly, plowing up great 
heaps of sand with one shell, and another perhaps 
would fill up the crevice. The broadsides from the 
New Ironsides were terrific, and the five monitors in 
line, together with five other gunboats, seemed to 



Volunteer Infantry. 71 

pour shell enough into Wagner to start several first 
class iron foundries. Shot and shell crashed above 
and within it and we wondered if half of them 
accomplished their mission. Before night came, 
hardly a gun boomed from Wagner, and many seemed 
to think an easy victory was within reach. As twi 
light approached the whole command lay under cover 
of the sand hills, waiting for the order to advance. 
The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts (colored regiment) 
were given the post of honor, the right of the first 
brigade, which position belonged to the Sixth ; but 
at the request of Col. Shaw of the Fifty-fourth, who 
wanted the black troops to distinguish themselves, 
Col. Chatfield granted them their wish. Gen. Strong, 
who was to lead the charge, then addressed them. 
He said, " Men of Massachusetts, I am going to put 
you in front of the chivalry of South Carolina, and 
they will pour iron hail in your faces; but don t 
flinch ; defend the flag and uphold the honor of the 
State of Massachusetts." He further told them "the 
Sixth Connecticut was immediately behind them, and 
I know they will not flinch." They fell upon one 
knee in the sand and with their right arm raised, 
they swore they would do it. 

The command formed silently on the beach; the 
men seemed impatient to move as the scene became 
exciting. " Close column, by companies," was the 
order given, and the first brigade was off for its work. 



72 Sixth Connecticut 

Steadily forward we moved, while the gunboats still 
roared away. At a given signal they ceased their 
fire and the order passed to charge. The rebels 
waited till we were within range and then poured a 
volley into our ranks from their guns on the parapet, 
while the riflemen rattled their bullets from the small 
arms. The Fifty-fourth wavered for a moment, and 
that moment was fatal to them ; they broke and fled. 
On pressed the Sixth through the iron hail, picked 
our way through the abatis, descended the ditch and 
climbed up the steep sides of the fort, and gaining 
the parapet, was among the rebels. The flash of 
a thousand rifles poured into us, followed in quick 
succession by hand grenades. Shrapnel, cannister 
and grape were freely showered into the ranks, while 
we leaped down to the casemates and bomb-proofs, 
driving the enemy before us in great confusion. 
They entered their rifle pits and checked our further 
advance. The night was so dark it was hard to dis 
tinguish friend from foe, and a signal from the rebels 
turned the fire of Fort Sumpter and Battery Gregg 
upon the angle of the fort which we held. In vain 
did we look for help from the second brigade. Many 
a brave soldier had sealed his loyalty with his blood, 
and Gens. Strong and Seymour, Col. Chatfield and 
others, were badly wounded and carried to the rear. 
We were virtually without any commanding officer 
to lead us. To wait for daylight would have been 



Volunteer Infantry. 73 

sheer madness, and the supporting brigade, terrified 
by the deadly cannonade, instead of relying upon the 
bayonet to accomplish the work, stopped and fired. 
The rebels saw the mistake and rallied upon the 
Sixth, which stood almost alone within their works. 
The charge was repulsed, but after remaining for 
about three hours under such a deadly fire, we escaped 
as best we could, with terrible loss. Had the second 
brigade supported us in time, no doubt we could 
have held it. The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regi 
ment rallied soon after they faltered and came up to 
the left angle of the fort, where they finally did good 
service. Here Col. Shaw met his death. The Sixth 
Regiment and the Connecticut colors were the first 
in the fort that night. The color-bearer, a German 
named Gustave DeBouge, was shot through the fore 
head while carrying the colors in the assault, and fell 
dead upon the flag, his life blood staining them 
through. Several brave ones who were near seized 
them, but they also fell either dead or wounded. 
Captain Frederick B. Osborn of Co. " K," as brave 
an officer as ever wore shoulder straps, finally suc 
ceeded in pulling them from under the bodies and 
bearing them off in triumph. Our flags were much 
shattered and torn, but both were saved from the 
enemy. 

In leaving Wagner that night, the ditch we crossed 
was filled with the dead and wounded, and we were 



7^ Sixth Connecticut 

compelled to step upon their bodies in making our 
escape. Many fell wounded upon the beach, and as 
the salt water surged over their bodies and in their 
wounds, their groans and cries were terrible to hear. 
Men begged piteously to others more fortunate, to 
remove them out of reach of the incoming tide. 
Our return to camp was attended with almost as much 
danger as our advance, and many brave men who 
were spared through the terrible ordeal in the fort, 
were either killed or wounded in returning to the 
rear. Every foot of ground seemed to be covered 
by the fire of the enemy s guns. Batteries Gregg 
and Wagner, Forts Johnson, Ripley and Sumpter, 
besides two gunboats in the harbor, all directed their 
missiles of death to further our destruction while 
retreating ; and how so many of us were spared 
through such a terrible conflict, can be attributed 
only to the goodness of our Heavenly Father. Truly 
the God of battles was on our side. 

Our loss was quite heavy, considering the force 
engaged ; the Sixth being exposed to the deadliest 
fire, their ranks were pretty well thinned out and the 
total figures footed up to 141 killed, wounded and 
missing. Many of the wounded brought off the field 
died the next day. Among the killed was Lieut. 
Stevens of Co. "I," a cannister shot passing through 
his heart. He was Ass t Adjutant General on Gen. 
Seymour s staff, a position he filled with great ability. 



Volunteer Infantry. 75 

Having made military matters a study for a number 
of years his services were valuable to the government. 
His body was brought off the field and buried be 
neath one of the lone palmettos. A large influx of 
surgeons arrived from the North a few days after the 
battle, many of whom were mere boys, having hardly 
attained their majority, without experience, and, 
many without common sense, came to Morris Island 
to assist in caring for the wounded. A slight 
wound in the limb was sufficient cause for them to 
amputate, and many suffered amputation of limbs that 
with proper treatment could have been spared to 
them. The writer saw a surgeon s table improvised 
on a sand bluff, where these " would-be-surgeons " 
were using the scalpel knife in severing the arms and 
legs of the wounded, and a great pile lay beside them. 
Many a victim protested against this outrage, but was 
told that it was the only thing that would prolong 
life. The victims in many cases died soon after the 
operation. 

Fatigue duty fell unusually hard upon the troops 
on the island, and every night found the Sixth in the 
trenches, building batteries or hauling heavy guns to 
the front. Under fire every day and night, the regi 
ment suffered the loss of many members by wounds 
and death. While at the front one day a flag of 
truce came from Wagner, borne by a rebel Captain 
named Tracy. Capt. Tracy of the Sixth met him and 



7<5 Sixth Connecticut 

found that he wanted to negotiate for an exchange of 
prisoners. Gen. Vodges was informed and the terms 
agreed upon. On Friday, July 24, a large steamer 
bearing our wounded, came down the harbor and ran 
alongside of one of the monitors. It was said she 
was a blockade runner and had recently ran the 
blockade. Upon her decks were Englishmen dressed 
in the height of fashion, talking loudly of the supe 
rior intellect of the southern chivalry. The steamer 
Cosmopolitan, which had recently been fitted up as a 
hospital ship, ran alongside and delivered up the 
rebel wounded and the rebels gave us 205 Union 
soldiers. They also reported that they had amputated 
the limbs of 25 and that 50 had died on their hands. 
We also learned that they were so indignant because 
our government employed negro troops, that when 
they found Col. Shaw s body they dug a deep trench 
and put the body in and then threw 25 dead negroes 
top of it. This circumstance we learned to be a fact, 
the pickets in our front having reported the same 
thing to us. 

The Sixth Regiment, so shattered in the charge of 
the 1 8th and depleted in numbers, was ordered to 
Hilton Head to recruit and care for the large num 
bers who were wounded. We landed there on the 
3ist of July, commanded by Captain Tracy, who was 
senior Captain in the regiment and highest officer for 
duty. While at the Head the news came to us of the 



Volunteer Infantry. 77 

death of Gen. Strong and Col. Chatfield, both having 
gone North to recruit their health. The men of the 
Sixth cherished very great affection for their beloved 
Colonel, and were grieved to hear of his untimely 
death. 

Col. Chatfield was born at Oxford, Conn., in 1826; 
was the son of Pulaski and Amanda Chatfield. He 
was apprenticed to the carpenter business in Derby, 
where he served four years at his trade ; after which 
he worked as a journeyman. In 1855, having moved 
to Waterbury, he was associated with a brother in 
building, and the firm was widely and favorably 
known. Always upright, a man of sterling integrity, 
prompt and honorable in all his dealings, he pos 
sessed the confidence and esteem of all with whom 
he came in contact. 

Col. Chatfield was born a soldier; he commenced as 
a private in the Derby Blues and was active in raising 
the Waterbury City Guard, and afterwards became its 
Captain. His service with the three months troops 
was a fine school in which to display his military 
genius, and he caught the true military spirit, which 
he seemed to infuse into his fellow soldiers. Subse 
quently, becoming Colonel of the Sixth, he brought 
it to a state of discipline second to none in the ser 
vice. The early part of the service seemed too much 
for him, and he remained at Annapolis, an invalid, 
while the regiment was sent on the expedition, but 



j8 Sixth Connecticut 

joined it again in January, 1862. At Pocotaligo he 
received a cannister shot in his right thigh, but recov 
ered sufficiently to join us again in April, when for a 
time he was placed by Gen. Hunter in command of 
the forces at Hilton Head. After serving there for 
some time, he was relieved at his own request and 
permitted to join in the operations on Morris Island. 
In the charge on Fort Wagner he was wounded in 
the leg, and in attempting to drag himself out, was 
hit a second time in his right hand, which knocked 
his sword out of his grasp. He was carried to the 
rear by Private Andrew H. Grogan of Co. "I," and 
Chaplain Woodruff procured transportation for him 
to his home. He spoke very feelingly in regard to 
the charge of his regiment, and inquired if the colors 
were safe. Being informed that all that was left of 
them was brought off the field, his eyes glistened as 
he replied, " Thank God for that ; I am so glad they 
are safe ; keep them as long as there is a thread left." 
He was sent home on a steamer, but the journey was 
exhausting to him and probably hastened his death. 
He passed away from his earthly labors August 10, 
surrounded by his family. Just before his death a 
gleam of consciousness was visible, and looking up 
he recognized his weeping family, and expressed his 
entire willingness and readiness to depart, and died 
with hardly a struggle. Had Col. Chatfield lived he 
would have distinguished himself, and no doubt risen 



Volunteer Infantry. yp 

high in rank ; his record a knight might envy. His 
noble deeds and eminently Christian character will 
ever be fresh in the memory of the members of the 
old Sixth Regiment. 



Sixth Connecticut 



CHAPTER VI. 

After the death of Col. Chatfield, Redfield Duryee 
was appointed Colonel of the Sixth, rising from Ad 
jutant to that position at a single step. He had been 
North on recruiting service for eighteen months pre 
vious to his appointment, but after securing that 
position he hastened to join the regiment in the field. 
The appointment was not received very pleasantly 
by the officers of the Sixth, nor by the privates, who 
expressed much dissatisfaction at his appointment. 
Those who had been with the regiment through thick 
and thin and had borne the brunt of the battles, were 
more justly entitled to promotion to that position 
than Redfield Duryee, who had been home for half 
of his term of enlistment. But merit is not always 
justly rewarded, and the appointment had to be en 
dured, although it was not according to our taste. 
Our new colonel enjoined upon the regiment severe 
drills and guard duties, while it was tasked severely 
and laboriously with fatigue duty every day and often 
far into the night. We found it difficult to endure 
the loss of Col. Chatfield. Few men, living in the 



Volunteer Infantry. 8\ 

midst of such temptations as army life afforded, could 
resist so practically the attractions that led so many 
good men astray ; yet he stood as a beacon light, and 
his counsel and judgment were often sought by those 
who were his superiors in rank. Had Col. Chatfield 
lived, the entire regiment would no doubt have re- 
enlisted ; but as the command passed into other 
hands, the number did not exceed 200 who consented 
to remain till the close of the war. Lieut. Col. 
Speidel and Capt. Leach resigned their commissions 
and left the regiment in August, 1863. Ill health was 
the cause of their resignations. 

Col. Speidel never fully recovered from the wound 
received at Pocotaligo, and the regiment was loth to 
part with him, as he endeared himself to the boys by 
his soldierly bearing and commanding ways. He 
was a brave officer and never flinched on the field, but 
always inspired the men with true courage and 
patriotism. 

October 2oth, five companies of the Sixth went on 
provost guard duty, relieving the Eighth Maine. 
We occupied the provost building and had charge of 
a large number of rebel prisoners, as well as others 
from Union regiments, who had been guilty of some 
crime known to military law. Among the rebel 
prisoners was a Captain Monroe whom the Sixth 
captured, with others, on Morris Island. He was 
son of the Mayor of Charleston, and a most bitter 



8 2 Sixth Connecticut 

and uncompromising rebel. He evinced no desire to 
shake hands over the "bloody chasm," but, on the 
contrary, was bitterly opposed to the Union and to 
the hireling soldiers employed by Lincoln. He 
raved and stormed in the guard house like a mad 
bull, and swore he would fight us to the bitter end 
whenever he should be exchanged or released. He 
was taken to some Northern prison with about 100 
other prisoners, a guard from the Sixth accompany 
ing them. 

Volunteering having partially subsided in the 
State, and as the government was in need of more 
troops, drafting commenced in other States as well as 
in Connecticut. The Sixth received about 200 men 
in October; some were conscripts and others drafted 
men, as but few voluntered for the service. Their 
advent was not hailed with much pleasure or satis 
faction by the old regiment, as they claimed that 
"forced" men would not fight and could not be 
trusted in case of an emergency. Some were vile 
roughs and were frequently in the guard house ; 
while others manifested a disposition to do their 
duty, and did make very good soldiers. Three of 
the substitutes deserted from the regiment while on 
picket, but were captured and placed in close con 
finement at the provost guard house. While there 
they succeeded in getting away twice ; the first time 
they were found in Ossanabaw Sound and were re- 



Volunteer Infantry. 83 

turned to the post, where they were tried for deser 
tion before a court martial, of which Capt. Tracy of 
the Sixth was president, found guilty and sentenced 
to be shot to death by musketry. They were then 
chained hand and foot to a post inside of the provost 
quarters ; and, notwithstanding these precautions, 
together with a strong guard, they succeeded in get 
ting away again. They took a boat near the pier 
and made off; but while in Warsaw sound near the 
shore, their boat grounded and they w r ere captured 
by a picket boat from the gunboat Patapsco. They 
were very bold, ingenious men, and their skill and 
perseverance might have won them honor if rightly 
applied. The culprits were Germans by birth : pri 
vates Henry Schumaker, of Co. " C," Henry Stark, of 
Co. "E," and Gustav Hoofan, of Co. "B." 

In the case of the latter an error was discovered in 
writing his name, the name Hoofan having been 
written Hoffman by the Judge Advocate. Col. Dur- 
yee wishing to be merciful to the full extent consist 
ent with duty, availed himself of this technical error 
and protested against his execution. This protest was 
allowed, and he was saved from death and ordered to 
return to duty with his regiment. The man was more 
than pleased at this announcement, but the Judge Ad 
vocate, a lieutenant of the Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania 
regiment, was severely censured in general orders 
for his inexcusable carelessness and fatal error. 



84 Sixth Connecticut 

The following order was issued to the troops for 
the execution of the deserters : 

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 7. 

HEADQUARTERS HILTON HEAD, ) 

Hilton Head, S. C., April 16, 1864. f 

In obedience to General Orders No. 50, Department of the 
South, Hilton Head, S. C., April 15, 1864, the sentence of private 
Henry Schumaker, of Co. " C," and private Henry Stark, Co. 
" E," Sixth regiment Connecticut Volunteers, who were tried be 
fore a court martial assembled at Hilton Head, S. C., March 4, 
1864, for the crime of desertion, and were sentenced to be shot to 
death with musketry, will be carried into execution at this Post 
on Sunday the iyth day of April, 1864, at three o clock P. M., on the 
field beyond the causeway and in the presence of all the troops of 
this command. All fatigue work within the line of the entrench 
ments will be suspended on that day during the afternoon, and 
every officer and man not upon the sick list or upon other duty, 
will be present. The firing party will be furnished by the Sixth 
Connecticut Volunteers. Capt. E. S. Babcock, gth U. S. C. T., 
Provost Marshal, will make the necessary arrangements for the 
execution. The several regiments and detachments comprising 
the command will report at two o clock p. M. to Lieut. Woodruff, 
A. A. D. C., who will be stationed there to direct them to their 
positions. 

By order of Col. REDFIELD DURYEE, 

WALTER FITCH, 

ist Lieut. 6th Conn. Vols., Post Adj. 

Official : 
D. A. WOODRUFF, 

ist Lieut. 6th Conn. Vols., A. A. D. C. 



Volunteer Infantry. 85 

As soon as the time had been fixed for their execu 
tion they were visited by the Provost Marshal, who 
informed them of their fate and advised them to pre 
pare for death. They seemed stolid and indifferent 
at first, but upon reflection they gave way to their 
feelings and desired to have a priest sent to them 
(they were both Roman Catholics), and Rev. Mr. 
Hasson, a Catholic priest who was in the department, 
was sent for and ministered to them. It was for a 
long time difficult to convince them that their case 
was hopeless, but Mr. Hasson s arguments finally 
forced conviction, and, after hearing their confession 
twice, he performed all the rites of the Church that 
were practicable. The prisoners were taken from 
their cells at about two o -clock, placed in army 
wagons and seated on the coffins in which they were 
to be buried. The column was formed as follows : 

Capt. E. S. Babcock, Provost Marshal, mounted. 

Capt. J. P. King, Asst. Provost Marshal, mounted. 

Drum Corps in two ranks. 

Firing Party of 24 men detailed from 6th Conn. 

The Prisoners in wagon seated on their coffins. 

Ambulance containing Rev. Mr. Hasson, and Chaplain 
Woodruff, of the 6th Conn.; Rev. Mr. Taylor of the Christian 
Commission ; the Surgeon of the Provost guard house, and the 
Surgeon of the 6th Connecticut. 

The funeral escort, consisting of a corporal and 
eight men, marched to funeral music, with arms re- 

8* 



86 Sixth Connecticut 

versed. Slowly the procession proceeded to the ap 
pointed place ; the square was formed on three sides, 
and the victims were driven around once that all 
might see them and avoid their fate. They main 
tained a calm demeanor to all, except as they passed 
our regiment they took off their caps several times 
to their old comrades. On reaching the end of the 
square they were assisted to alight from the wagons, 
the coffins were placed on the ground, the culprits 
sitting down upon them white the Provost Marshal 
read the charges, findings and sentence. After a 
short prayer by the priest they were blindfolded and 
their hands tied behind them and made to kneel upon 
their coffins, facing the center of the square. The 
firing party came up and were halted at six paces 
distant, when, at a signal from Capt. Babcock, they 
fired and the victims fell upon their coffins. Schu- 
maker was pierced with nine bullets and Stark with 
eight. They lay just as they had fallen till the whole 
command marched past them on the way to camp, 
when they were put into the coffins and buried. 

On the 2oth of April, Capt. Lewis C. Allen, Jr., 
died of disease. He was formerly a member of a 
militia company in Georgia, and afterwards remov 
ing to New Haven, was drill officer of the New Haven 
Blues. He went out as ist Lieut, in Capt. Root s 
company in the Third three months troops, and later 
as captain of the " Brewster Rifles," Co. " F," of the 



Volunteer Infantry. 87 

Sixth regiment. He participated in all the battles of 
the regiment, and was looked upon as a brave and 
efficient officer by all the regiment and was much 
esteemed by his own company for his uniform cour 
tesy and gentlemanly bearing. 

Lieut. Col. Klein, with the re-enlisting veterans of 
the regiment, were given a thirty days furlough after 
re-enlisting; they sailed for the North and were 
received in New Haven with demonstrations of re 
spect, escorted to Music Hall, where Mayor Tyler 
addressed a welcome to the returning soldiers, after 
which they sat down to a banquet provided for them. 

The regiment remained at Hilton Head through 
the fall and winter months of 63 and 64, engaging 
in an occasional scout after the Johnnies, drilling 
and doing fatigue duty in various ways. If a battery 
was to be built or earthworks thrown up, the Sixth 
was sure to have a hand in it. Many of our officers 
having resigned and our ranks being depleted by 
disease, we were finally ordered, with our corps, to 
join Butler on the James River, and we bade adieu 
to South Carolina on the 2yth of April, 1864, and 
sailed for our new scene of labor and strife. We 
arrived at Hampton Roads after due time and landed 
at Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown. Here we 
found large numbers of troops encamped in very 
close proximity to each other, and indications 
pointed to a general advance along the line. The 



8 Sixth Connecticut 

redoubtable Ben seemed in his element and was busy 
from morning till far into the night, making the 
necessary preparations for the conflict. Our corps 
(the loth), and the i8th corps, under Gen. W. F. 
Smith, were ordered to pack up all the surplus cloth 
ing belonging to the officers and men, and the cooks 
were divested of all their cooking utensils except 
two camp kettles. Large quantities of clothes and 
goods were put in boxes and barrels and shipped to 
Norfolk, where they were to be stored ; but, unfor 
tunately, the steamer containing the goods of the 
Sixth sprung a leak and sank, the crew barely escap 
ing with their lives. Butler ordered the command to 
go as light as possible in regard to clothing- and 
effects, and the rations were cut down to such extent 
that we were to be deprived of many articles that 
were palatable to a soldier. Beef, beans and potatoes 
were excluded from our bill of fare, and bacon and 
salt pork were to be more freely used. Half rations 
of soap and full rations of whiskey and quinine were 
among the items which were considered necessary for 
our comfort, and lastly, two pairs of Uncle Sam s 
brogans w r ere ordered for each man, fearing, perhaps, 
that the sacred mud of Virginia might draw off one 
pair while experiencing a march after a gentle fall of 
dew. 

May 4th, the whole command embarked at Glou 
cester Point and ascended the James. The infantry, 



Volunteer Infantry. 89 

artillery and cavalry numbered about 25,000 men, all 
told. The gunboats went up the river a day earlier 
than the transports. The scenery along the banks of 
the James was indeed beautiful ; the corn and cotton 
crops were growing splendidly ; large fields in culti 
vation met the eye on every hand, and everything 
clearly indicated that Johnny Reb did not expect us 
quite so soon. The steamers were crowded with the 
troops, and the bunting streaming from the ma^ts and 
rigging was a pleasing sight to all beholders. If the 
enemy saw this advance of Butler s army coming they 
could not but dread the results. 

The 6th of May the entire force landed at Bermuda 
Hundred and pushed inland. The day was extremely 
warm and the extra pair of brogans that " Bennie " 
made us take were soon thrown off, as well as blank 
ets and knapsacks, anything to lighten our load. 
The march through the woods and fields was strewed 
with these articles, but none could tell whether they 
would ever be needed again, for we wist not what was 
before us. We marched about eight miles and halted 
for the night in a piece of pine woods, where we 
threw up a rude entrenchment to cover us against a 
sudden attack. The night passed with no general 
alarm, although the advance pickets skirmished with 
the enemy. We were up betimes in the morning and 
on the move, passing many swamps and deep mo 
rasses, which made progress slow. A large detach- 



go Sixth Connecticut 

ment were felling trees to make passage for the artil 
lery through the woods and swamps. 

On the 9th of May our division moved on to the 
Petersburg & Richmond R. R., at Chester station, 
where we cut the telegraph wires and tore up the 
track, burning the ties and poles. Our brigade pried 
up the rails as we stood close together, and tumbled 
them down a steep bank. Over a half mile of track 
was thus disposed of at a time. We destroyed about 
three miles of the track at this time and guarded the 
turnpike and all approaches, while the i8th army 
corps engaged the rebels near Richmond, but with 
little success, except to find their position. The next 
day Gen. D. H. Hill s corps advanced from Rich 
mond and our forces engaged them all along the line. 
After a sharp contest which continued over two hours, 
the rebels withdrew from the field and we retired a 
short distance to the rear. The casualties of the Sixth 
were one killed (Capt. Jay P. Wilcox), twenty 
wounded and four missing. 

Captain Wilcox left Waterbury as a private soldier 
in the Sixth, but was soon promoted to the rank of 
corporal and thence passed rapidly to that of captain. 
As an officer, Capt. Wilcox gained the honor and 
respect of all under his command. Resolute, bold 
and fearless, he proved an honor to the cause, and the 
Union lost one of its noblest defenders. 

On the i4th of May the Sixth was ordered, with 



Volunteer Infantry. pi 

the rest of the corps, to advance to Proctor s Creek, 
near Drury s Bluff, at which place we arrived after 
little skirmishing. We halted near the edge of a 
piece of woods, expecting to remain but a short time ; 
but Gen. Butler ordered the Quartermasters to bring 
up all camp equipage and establish our camps there 
before commencing operations still farther in advance. 
We knew, however, that we could not advance very 
much farther except by bringing on a general engage 
ment, as the enemy were strongly entrenched a short 
distance from us, as we could see them working on 
their batteries every day. The evening of the i5th 
the Sixth occupied the extreme front at the center of 
the line, on picket. The night passed with but little 
firing on either side. Just before daylight, while a 
thick fog prevailed, the rebels massed their forces and 
made a very determined dash in our front, charging 
upon us furiously, shouting with that peculiar yell so 
characteristic of the Johnnies. We knew they out 
numbered us, and to stand alone as a picket line 
would be of no avail ; yet we emptied our rifles at 
them several times and fell slowly back upon the 
reserve. They proved too strong for our corps and 
it gave way gradually. We did not "retreat," but 
"changed front to the rear," and contested every foot 
of ground ; but the enemy knowing our strength, 
forced us back slowly but surely. The turnpike 
being the safest ground to pass over, was besieged by 



$2 Sixth Connecticut 

the troops; ambulances carrying the wounded, negro 
men and women, rebel prisoners and Union soldiers 
filled the roadway, while heads of staff were busy 
issuing orders to the different regiments to form here 
and there to check the rebel advance. One regiment 
would file in a piece of woods ; another made a stand 
in a ravine, while our batteries limbered up to get a 
better position and the whole force resisted bravely 
the attack. We were forced back about six miles, 
and, as night came on, the battle ended. 

The loss on our side was much larger than that of 
the rebels. The Sixth suffered severely, considering 
the numbers engaged : seven killed and fifty-three 
wounded. Among the wounded were Lieut. Col. 
Meeker, Captains Charles H. Nichols and John 
N. Tracy, Lieutenants Bennett S. Lewis, Charles J. 
Buckbee and Norman Provost. Capt. Horatio D. 
Eaton, of Hartford, was killed while encouraging his 
men forward. He served through the three months 
campaign and afterwards went out as lieutenant of 
the Sixth. He was greatly beloved at home by a 
large circle of friends, and possessed the esteem of 
the regiment. Capt. Biebel and twenty others were 
captured by the enemy. 

The day after this battle the men of the Sixth who 
who had re-enlisted came back from their furlough 
and reported for duty, but found our position rather 
warmer than they anticipated, quite unlike the 



Volunteer Infantry. pj 

scenes they had just left at the North. We threw up 
entrenchments every night, working till morning 
dawned, and the Johnnies were unceasing in their 
efforts to dislodge us, many of the men being wound 
ed while at work. The picket line was relieved always 
at night, and we were invariably shelled while going 
on that duty. After being posted on the lines things 
generally quieted down, as the distance between the 
rebel and Union pickets was often less than three 
rods. Conversation was kept up and exchanges of 
newspapers frequently took place, as well as the usual 
exchange of " terbacker " for coffee. 

The old Sixth was again engaged on the 2oth of 
May with the enemy ; the Johnnies fought stubbornly 
and seemed determined on driving us back. We held 
our ground, but made no advance. After about four 
hours they were repulsed and fell back. Lieut. 
Bradley and two privates were mortally wounded, and 
died soon after being brought into camp. Thirty-two 
of the regiment were wounded and one missing. 
Thus the Yanks of the Sixth were constantly reduced 
by these frequent skirmishes, and duty fell pretty 
severe upon those who were able to perform it. 
Scarcely an hour passed, day or night, without being 
shelled by the enemy, and rest seemed out of the 
question. The pale faces and haggard looks of the 
men told too plainly what they endured. Yet few 
reproached the cause in which they were engaged. 

9 



p4 Sixth Connecticut 

There is very little poetry and a good deal of hard 
work in an active campaign. 

Col. Redfield Duryee resigned his commission on 
the 2yth of May, as failing health, it is said, incapaci 
tated him for active service in the field. The captain 
of the ist Connecticut Battery, Alfred P. Rockwell, 
was chosen to fill the place. Col. Rockwell was 
brave and fearless, and held in esteem by the mem 
bers of the Sixth. 

The 2nd of June the enemy again tried to force our 
lines and did drive back some portion of the 3d New 
Hampshire, but they were repulsed and the line re 
gained. The artillery duel on both sides waged hot 
for a few hours, and it was difficult to determine 
which would come out best in the end. One rebel 
colonel was killed and brought within our lines, and 
a lieutenant and twenty-six men deserted to us, being, 
as they said, tired of the war. The loss to the Sixth 
was only three wounded. 

Part of the command, including the Sixth, were 
sent across the Appomatox River on the 9th of June, 
to engage the enemy at a certain point, while the 
cavalry destroyed a railroad. We came upon the 
outposts of the enemy, drove them in, were subjected 
to a severe shelling, but with slight loss on our side. 
The cavalry, it was said, accomplished its object, 
and the next day found us back to our old line of 
works. One morning the videttes reported that the 



Volunteer Infantry. 95 

enemy had evacuated their line of rifle pits on our 
front, and the orders were issued for our corps to 
advance and make a reconnoissance, which we did. 
Finding their line deserted, we pushed forward and 
skirmished with them, they falling back all the while 
evidently to get us into an ambuscade. We fell back 
to the line evacuated by the rebels and awaited re 
sults. The sharpshooters annoyed us exceedingly all 
day, being posted in the trees, and their clothing was 
so near the color of the bark of the trees that it was 
difficult to discover their position. The enemy gave 
us a vigorous shelling early in the afternoon ; and as 
that nearly always preceded an advance, the whole 
line awaited anxiously the result. The Johnnies 
were soon discovered slowly approaching through 
the woods directly in front of the Sixth. They 
rushed forward with a yell, but did not find us unpre 
pared to meet them. The bullets flew lively for a 
time, and the rebels swayed backward, but soon ral 
lied and rushed forward in large numbers, forcing 
back the Union lines and regaining their rifle pits. 
Their numbers must have been very much larger than 
ours, and they evidently expected we would take 
their pits when they fell back, and no doubt had a 
plan laid to gobble us all up ; but our commander 
displayed that wisdom requisite for the occasion. 
We retired, however, with considerable loss. The 
Sixth lost in this engagement 5 killed, 16 wounded and 



p<5 Sixth Connecticut 

18 missing. Capt. Nichols was captured by the 
enemy. 

The weather was excessively warm and no exer 
tion was required to produce perspiration. The 
thermometer on June 22d rose to 103 degrees in the 
shade. We were apprised of the fact that our worthy 
President, Abraham Lincoln, was near us, and all 
that were not engaged on duty were ordered to ap 
pear near the regimental quarters and render a 
proper salute. He came on horseback, attended by 
Gen. Butler and staff. The troops greeted him pleas 
antly and gave hearty cheers along the whole line. 
The President looked careworn and troubled. Un 
doubtedly the trials through which the nation was 
passing had much to do with his depression of spirits. 

The next day we received some rebel papers which 
had an article headed, "What mean those cheers?" 
In allusion to the cheers which they distinctly heard, 
they inferred that we had received some good news of 
a recent Union victory ; but as no such information 
had come to them through their sources, they finally 
came to the conclusion that it must be some scheme 
made known to the troops from the fertile brain of 
that " beefy, bloated Massachusetts Yankee," as they 
called Gen. Butler. 

Sheridan s cavalry were at the " White House," 
and were ordered to join Grant at the rear of Peters 
burg on the 25th of June. Some of our division 



Volunteer Infantry. 97 

were sent over the Appomatox to cover his retreat. 
The Sixth Connecticut and Third New Hampshire 
regiments formed a part of the force employed for 
that purpose, which returned to camp after their 
mission was accomplished. Sergt. Andrew Grogan, 
of Co. "I," who had been but recently promoted to 
2d Lieutenant, went on the picket line on the evening 
of June 29, in charge of the pickets of the Sixth. 
The rebels fired upon the line, wounding Lieut. 
Grogan in the thigh. He was carried to camp and 
the surgeons found it necessary to amputate the limb 
to save his life. The operation was performed suc 
cessfully and he fully recovered. Lieut. Grogan was 
exemplary in his habits and was a consistent Christian ; 
respected and loved by the regiment, and it was with 
sorrow that we were obliged to part with his services. 
It will be remembered that Lieut. Grogan bore Col. 
Chatfield from Fort Wagner after the Colonel was 
twice wounded in that memorable assault on the 
night of July i8th. 

Gen. Butler issued an order calling for volunteers 
for fatigue duty upon his famous Dutch Gap Canal, 
offering eight cents an hour extra pay and two rations 
of whisky each day. The work was very laborious, 
the enemy keeping a continuous fire upon the work 
ing parties, which together with the excessive heat, 
rendered the service anything but desirable ; yet 
many availed themselves of the offer. The pickets 

9* 



y8 Sixth Connecticut 

were strengthened and the reserve made secure to 
prevent any sudden dash upon the working parties ; 
while our gunboats in the James rendered effective 
service in dispersing these advances. The Johnnies 
were pretty sure to retire if the gunboats sent their 
compliments. Some of the captured rebels affirmed 
that they could stand any ordinary shelling, but when 
our navy sent a whole " blacksmith shop, with forge 
and bellows complete," they thought it was time to 
" change front to the rear." 

The report that Gen. A. P. Hill, of the rebel army, 
was advancing south of Richmond in the direction 
of Petersburg, aroused our General commanding, 
and Gen. Smith s corps was ordered on the move. 
The Sixth was accordingly ordered to cook up the 
usual three days rations. We left the front shortly 
after midnight on the morning of the i4th of August, 
and at about 5 o clock Sunday morning we crossed 
the James River on the pontoons, drove in the ad 
vance pickets and rapidly pushed forward, skirmish 
ing with the enemy at different points. We soon 
heard the rebel yell, and the enemy came pouring 
upon us with all their fury. Our regiment, divested 
of knapsacks, immediately charged upon them and 
captured two lines of rebel earthworks, driving the 
enemy before us at a place called Strawberry Plains, 
near Malvern Hill. We skirmished with the enemy 
all day, and when night came on our division occu- 



Volunteer Infantry. pp 

pied Hancock s old works near the hill, and gladly 
availed ourselves of a chance to lay down, but not to 
sleep, as that would have been a luxury not to be 
entertained. Owing to the excessive heat of the day, 
many fell from the ranks completely exhausted. So 
severe had been our campaign in Virginia, in its 
marches and fatigue duty, that the Sixth mustered 
but few men for duty. We were continually on the 
move; and often, in our midnight marches, some 
would fall asleep while in the ranks, and as soon as 
the order was given to halt and rest, the entire regi 
ment would fall down where it stood, and sleep 
during the few moments allotted for rest. 

The Sixth moved again on the i5th of August and 
fought the battle known as Deep Run. We were 
posted in the woods with Hawley s brigade, looking 
for the position of the enemy ; but the woods were 
so dense that we could scarcely stand in line. The 
rebel earthworks were in our front, but their exact 
position or strength was unknown to the brigade. 
We fixed bayonets and cocked our rifles preparatory 
to an advance and charge. Gen. Terry informed us 
in whispers, as near as he could, the location of the 
enemy, and directed us to creep through the under 
brush till we came to a certain tree, and then charge. 
The word " forward " was given and the brigade 
moved through the woods as fast as the tangled un 
derbrush would permit. The enemy discovered our 



foo Sixth Connecticut 

advance ere we had proceeded far, and with a loud 
yell they opened fire from howitzers and musketry. 
The latter was terrific, and the bullets skipped 
through the leaves of the trees in terrible volleys. 
In passing through the woods we came to an open 
ing which was made by the trees being felled and 
brush cleared away. About twenty rods in our front 
ranged a strong earthwork, behind which the rebels 
were strongly posted, and in the front was a huge 
abatis almost defying any approach. On went our 
brigade with a cheer, tumbling through the abatis 
and picking our way as best we could amid a furious 
storm of bullets ; but the desperate rebels held their 
works till they saw us clear of the abatis and knew 
that we were coming for them, when they turned and 
fled ; but we were too quick for some of them. 
Springing upon them in their pits we had a hand to 
hand combat, till they saw it was useless to hold out 
longer and a few surrendered, while the main body 
skedaddled through a corn field into a piece of 
woods. Beyond this point we did not proceed, as a 
deep ravine skirted the edge of the field, and beyond 
this the enemy were massing their scattered forces 
preparatory to regaining w T hat they had lost. 

With our force engaged and with the rebel force in 
front, it was deemed imprudent to remain on the cap 
tured ground and we fell back slowly, harrassed by 
the rebel sharpshooters. Once they charged upon 



Volunteer Infantry. 101 

our line, forcing us back with greater speed than we 
cared to travel on that hot day ; and, although we did 
not run, we executed "some pretty tall walking." 
A second dash made upon us we repelled with a few 
bullets, which prevented any further trouble from 
them. They recaptured their lost works and, doubt 
less, considered themselves the victors. Our captures 
amounted to about 200 prisoners and two stands of 
colors. The Sixth lost in this action five killed, sixty- 
nine wounded and eleven missing. Among the 
wounded were Captains Bennett S. Lewis, John 
Slottlar and Dwight A. Woodruff (severely), and 
Lieutenants John Waters, Joseph Miller and George 
Bellows. Capt. Woodruff suffered the amputation of 
his arm and endured severe pain for a few weeks, till 
released by death. He entered the army as a private 
and was steadily promoted for good conduct. He 
was brave and faithful, beloved by the regiment, and 
his untimely death was regretted by all. The color 
guard of the Sixth was worsted in this engagement, 
the sergeant with two corporals were wounded, and 
one was overcome by the heat. The remaining cor 
poral, Edward S. Downs, seized the flag and brought 
it off the field in safety. 

The second day after this engagement the rebels, 
emboldened by the fact of the Union lines not being 
advanced, made a simultaneous attack all along our 
lines, and drove in our pickets, but w r ere repulsed 



IO2 Sixth Connecticut 

after a sharp skirmish, and they were glad enough to 
retire. The corps fell back about two miles at night 
to a former position occupied by us, and at seven 
o clock orders came for us to march again. It had 
been raining quite hard, and that Virginia mud was 
decidedly uncomfortable to march in. The artillery 
often got stuck in the mud and the command was 
necessarily delayed. After a wearisome march of 
seven hours we crossed the Appomatox river at Point 
of Rocks and resumed our march to the Weldon 
R. R. near Ream s Station, in the rear of Petersburg. 
Here we were again posted at the front. The Sixth 
occupied one side of the railroad track with the rebels 
on the other. Tents were out of the question. When 
a regiment moves from one place to another and halts 
for a season, to use a military term, " we pitch our 
tents;" but in this Virginia campaign tents were ob 
solete, and the term now used was, " we dug our 
holes." Tents served to attract the enemy and draw 
their fire, and it was very unsafe to sleep in one even 
if we could do so ; but in the holes in the ground we 
felt comparatively secure. It was rather a ludicrous 
sight to a casual observer to find an army of men 
burrowing in holes in the earth like so many wood- 
chucks, and yet such was the fact. The whole of 
Grant s line, extending from the south of Petersburg 
along the line of the Appomatox River down across 
Bermuda Hundred to the James, the army, when not 



Volunteer Infantry. IOJ 

engaged, were inside the " rat holes," as the boys 
termed them. Some of these holes held a corporal s 
guard, while others only served for two or three. 
They were hastily made, without any regard to arch 
itectural proportions, and yet not so deep but that 
they could be quickly evacuated. 

Shelling from the rebels and from our side was 
kept up day after day and night after night for weeks, 
and when the tired soldier had a few moments to 
sleep he quickly availed himself of it, and no amount 
of shelling would disturb his slumbers ; but let the 
clear notes of the bugle sound through the air and he 
was quickly at his post. We knew the bugle call 
meant work ; either some advance was threatened, or 
the line ordered to move to another quarter. It 
required but little time to pack up our household 
goods, and we were not required to run after drays 
to load them, but the clothes we wore were our bed 
ding, and any hole we found when night overtook us 
was our bed, with the sky for a covering and with a 
consciousness that we were battling for the right, 
made sleep attractive to the Union soldier. 

Gen. Hawley s brigade was ordered out on the 
morning of Sept. 3d to witness the execution of a 
soldier of the yth Connecticut by hanging. The 
brigade formed three sides of a hollow square around 
the gallows and saw the victim yield up his life at the 
end of a rope. He had some real or fancied grudge 



104 Sixth Connecticut 

against a man, and on the battle-field of Olustee, Fla., 
he took the opportunity to murder him, thinking, no 
doubt, the exciting scenes on the field would cover 
u.p his crime; but he was detected, tried before a 
drum-head court martial, found guilty and sentenced 
to death by hanging, and the day above mentioned 
the sentence was carried out. Another scene wit 
nessed by our regiment, took place soon after, which 
was the act of drumming a soldier out of camp for 
cowardice on the battle field. The soldier was a pri 
vate of Co. " I," of the Sixth, who was convicted of 
cowardice by refusing to fight, and skulked to the 
rear. His head was shaved and the word " coward," 
painted on a board, was put on his back, and he was 
marched through the brigade, with the drum corps 
playing the Rogue s March. 

The Sixth remained in the trenches around Peters 
burg, indulging in frequent skirmishing and entrench 
ing themselves, occasionally holding short confabs 
with the rebel pickets, getting their views on the war 
question, till the nth of September, 1864, when they 
were ordered a short distance to the rear and drawn 
up in front of Gen. Terry s headquarters, where the 
non-re-enlisted men were mustered out of service. 
Their term of three years had expired, and the rebels, 
as if to give a parting salute, threw a shell into our 
midst which exploded, doing no damage, however, 
as the word " cover " was given in earnest this time. 



Volunteer Infantry. 105 

It was with pride and not a little satisfaction that the 
boys relinquished their trusty rifles, which had been 
their constant companions through many a hard 
fought conflict. Gen. Terry, in a speech to them, 
said : " The State of Connecticut might well be proud 
of the record of the Sixth." He thanked us person 
ally for our valor on the field, and hoped that we 
would live many years to recite the marches and bat 
tles on the field to the loved ones at home; and 
expressed a wish that the conflict would soon termi 
nate, that he might also enjoy the blessings of civil 
life. Cheers were given with a will for our brave 
commander, and many a silent prayer went up for 
his welfare. 

" Three days rations " were issued to the boys for 
the last time, and they bade an affectionate adieu to 
the comrades who were to remain. Many a tear 
glistened in the eyes of the old soldiers as the last 
good-bye was said, and all expressed a wish that the 
war would soon be over and they also be permitted 
to greet their friends at home. The boys " changed 
front to the rear," and took the cars to City Point, 
and there embarked on the steamer United States. 
After a pleasant sail and the usual delays, we reached 
New York early on the morning of Sept. 15, landing 
at the foot of Canal street, North River; marched 
down Canal to Broadway, and down Broadway to 
the Battery, where a bountiful collation was served 



106 Sixth Connecticut 

to us by the " Sons of Connecticut " residing in New 
York. After the repast was finished, they went on 
board the steamer Nassau and sailed for New Haven, 
arriving there at about 7 o clock in the evening. 
Here a splendid reception awaited the old Sixth. 
Citizens and the military joined as an escort, and 
amid the booming of cannon (with blank cartridges) 
and the fireworks along the streets, the boys marched 
to the State House, where they were heartily wel 
comed and invited to partake of a rich and tempting 
repast. Ample justice was done to the viands, after 
which the boys separated for the night. Their final 
muster out and discharge was consummated on the 
lyth of September, just three years from the day the 
regiment left the State. 



Volunteer Infantry. 107 



CHAPTER VII. 

The Sixth remained around Petersburg on the 
line of the railroad after the non-re-enlisted men had 
returned home, skirmishing with the enemy, till the 
28th of September, when Butler s army faced to the 
right and crossed the Appomatox and hurried for 
ward toward Richmond. Gen. Grant had resolved 
that a further advance toward Richmond in Butler s 
front, while a demonstration from Warren and Han 
cock would weaken the rebel forces so that they 
would retire and give our siege trains an opportunity 
to press nearer the doomed city. The loth corps 
crossed the James and pushed forward on the ex 
treme right along Four Mile Creek, and advanced 
vigorously up the New Market road, where it met 
the rebels and a general engagement ensued all along 
the lines. Musketry firing was very rapid and the 
shells exploded with terrible force over the heads 
of the gallant soldiers. The steady tramp soon be 
came a double quick and the double quick became a 
run, when the frightened rebels showed signs of 
weakness ; yet they fought with desperation worthy 



io8 Sixth Connecticut 

a better cause. The i8th corps confronted Fort 
Gilmer, where it was for a few moments checked. 
The loth corps, under the gallant Terry, then re 
doubled its efforts and soon effected a junction with 
the i8th corps near Fort Harrison. Then the whole 
line advanced with a cheer and the rebels fell back in 
confusion. The Sixth, with Terry s corps, advanced 
up the Darbytown road until the head of the column 
reached a point within three miles of Richmond, 
where the spires of the churches and roofs of houses 
were easily discernible. The success attending the 
other parts of the line was not sufficient to warrant 
advancing any further just then, and the corps fell 
back a short distance, where it entrenched itself. 

Fort Harrison was a strong earthwork of great 
advantage to the rebels. The position was too val 
uable to surrender without another trial. The fol 
lowing day Gen. Lee brought additional reinforce 
ments from Petersburg to hold their position, but 
they, like the others, were unable to stand before the 
Union fire. The capture of Fort Harrison was not 
gained without severe loss to the Connecticut troops. 
The Sixth, however, met with comparatively small 
loss. The ist of October, Gen. Hawley s brigade 
advanced again toward Richmond and was subjected 
to a severe fire upon the Darbytown road, skirmish 
ing with the enemy along the creeks and swamps, 
with no chance for a pitched battle. The next week 



Volunteer Infantry. lop 

was full of exposure and privation. The troops had 
crossed the James without tents, and many without 
blankets ; and what little sleep they gained was not 
very refreshing. They were always compelled to be 
under arms, and the utmost vigilance was required, 
besides being much of the time under fire ; and when 
not engaged skirmishing, were hard at work with the 
pick and shovel, entrenching themselves. Our rifles, 
of course, had to be close at hand, to be grasped in 
an instant, and very often were we compelled to drop 
one to seize the other. Words cannot express the 
trials and exposures which the Union troops were 
called to pass through at different periods of the 
campaign. The Virginia campaign was unusually 
severe. Most of the time, for seven months, the 
troops were without tents, and but few had overcoats. 
Fatigue parties were at work night and day ; lines of 
works were thrown up to afford protection from the 
enemy s bullets. Whole acres of land were turned 
over, and many a tree was felled to make a clearing 
by which a sudden advance might be checked. The 
troops had little or no chance to cook their rations, 
and more salt pork was eaten raw than was ever 
boiled. A ramrod served the purpose of a gridiron, 
while an army shovel proved a good frying pan. 

The enemy made a vigorous attack on the yth of 
October on Gen. Terry s line, and came dashing on 
as if intent to drive the Union forces into the James 



Sixth Connecticut 

River. The Sixth was the first Connecticut regiment 
engaged ; some of the regiments fell back under the 
withering fire. The One Hundredth New York Regi 
ment especially dishonored their hitherto good fame 
by breaking their line and fleeing in confusion, but 
to the credit of all the regiments from Connecticut, 
be it said, they kept an unbroken front to the foe ; 
and notwithstanding the twice repeated assaults, the 
enemy were forced to retire from the field and the 
division entrenched themselves still more, and at mid 
night the old picket line was re-established. An 
attack upon the right of the rebel line was contem 
plated and the troops again advanced to meet the foe. 
Passing out beyond the rude line of earthworks, 
they came upon Chapin s Farm, and from thence 
they proceeded through the woods, across a wide 
ravine and to the plains beyond. The skirmishers 
opened fire and cautiously advanced; the enemy s 
advance line was pressed back into their entrenched 
position ; inactive firing was kept up for several 
hours while our forces neared those of the enemy. 
The enemy s position was favorable to them, as the 
dense thicket of scrub oaks and the tangled under 
brush rendered it exceedingly difficult for our troops 
to preserve any kind of a line ; the forces seemed 
determined, however, to go forward, and go forward 
they did ; but the advance resulted disastrously and 
the men fell back again, abandoning the assault. 



Volunteer Infantry. nr 

Col. Rockwell was in command of the .Sixth. 
Lieut. Col. Meeker resigned and Major Daniel Klein 
succeeded him. Capt. Hiram L. Grant was pro 
moted to be Major. Rev. Charles C. Tiffany, for 
merly pastor of a church in Derby, was appointed 
Chaplain. He was said to be a man of fine scholarly 
attainments and with his whole heart in the cause. 

Capt. Frederick B. Osborn of New Haven was hon 
orably discharged Oct. 25, 1864, as his time of enlist 
ment had expired. The Sixth lost no officer more 
loyal than him ; brave and unflinching, he often 
inspired courage where courage was lacking, and he 
asked no soldier to follow where he dared not him 
self lead. Through his daring and bravery the colors 
of the Sixth were saved in the assault on Fort Wag 
ner. The first Union flag that waved over Morris 
Island was borne by him, fastened to his sword. 
Before the war he was a marine in the U. S. service 
four years, during which time he cruised 21,000 miles, 
touching at European cities, and visited the Holy 
land. He was also on the frigate Niagara when she 
laid the Atlantic Cable. His term of service in the 
navy having expired, he hastened home to remain 
only a few months, for the bombardment of Sumpter 
again enlisted his loyalty, and he joined the first 
company of the first regiment of three months 
troops, passed through the memorable Bull Run 
campaign, and when the three years troops were 



112 Sixth Connecticut 

called for, he was offered a Captaincy in the Sixth 
Regiment, which his modesty prevented him from 
accepting; but he was finally induced to accept the 
position of ist Lieutenant in Co. " K," and by the 
death of Capt. Gerrish was promoted to the vacancy. 
He acquitted himself with great credit in his position 
as Captain, and would have honored a field officer s 
commission, for he seemed to lead a charmed life. 
Where bullets were thickest there he was found, gal 
lantly leading his men, with comparatively little 
thought for himself, so dear was the cause of the old 
flag to his heart, and he often won the respect and 
admiration of those higher in rank, by his deeds of 
daring, and unflinching zeal for the cause. Within a 
year after his discharge he was accidentally killed on 
the New York &: New Haven Railroad. A large 
number of the veterans attended his funeral, and the 
casket was draped with the flag he carried on Morris 
Island. 

As early winter set in, the old regiments began the 
work of reorganizing. Many left the ranks, dis 
charged after an honorable service, and new officers 
were appointed; and, as a lull appeared, the troops 
began to provide log huts for themselves to sleep in. 
As November came on the peace men of the North 
began to make threats of violence against the ballot 
box, and large frauds were discovered. It seemed to 
be their desire to stuff the ballot boxes and call the 



Volunteer Infantry. 113 

war a failure, and to prevent, if possible, anyone from 
voting war measures. Gen. Butler was transferred 
to New York as commander of that Department, and 
he was accompanied by a division of troops under 
Gen. Jos. R. Hawley. There were two brigades in 
the division of 3,000 men each. The Sixth was in 
the ist brigade under command of Col. Greeley. 
Col. Rockwell, of the Sixth, commanded the 26. bri 
gade. The troops made a landing on Staten Island 
for a short time, but most of the time were kept on 
board the steamers in the North and East rivers. 
The men suffered severely on this transfer from the 
South to the cool air of the North. They were kept 
on board the boats in a crowded state, and no officer 
or man allowed to go on shore. Friends of the reg 
iments, wives, sweethearts, &c., came many miles, 
some of them, but were not permitted to see them. 
After the Presidential election had passed, the troops 
immediately returned to their old position on the 
James. The Sixth found the log cabins they had 
made with so much care all destroyed, and were 
obliged to build others to protect themselves from 
the chilly nights. 

In December, Gen. Grant ordered an advance on 
Fort Fisher at the mouth of Cape Fear river, N. C., 
in order to suppress, if possible, the blockade running 
which was carried on to a very great extent. Run 
ning into Wilmington and unloading their cargoes, 



114 Sixth Connecticut 

which were thence transferred through the confed 
eracy, they became a great help to the rebel commis 
sary. Gen. Butler was dispatched with about 6,500 
men, assisted by Admiral Porter with 73 vessels, car 
rying about 655 guns. The fleet was well armed, and 
the land forces were in good condition for an assault. 
The gun boats opened fire and cannonading was ter 
rific. The forces landed and a feeble assault was 
made. The troops pushed their skirmish line within 
150 yards of the fort and captured a little outwork 
called Flag Pond battery, with sixty-five men. Gen. 
Butler conceived the idea that nothing short of a 
regular siege could accomplish the result, and there 
fore withdrew the army and returned to Hampton 
Roads. Admiral Porter was dissatisfied with the re 
sult. The President and Gen. Grant both believed 
that our forces, if led by a competent commander, 
could capture the works, and soon another advance 
was contemplated, but this time under the gallant 
Terry. The forces embarked with the addition of 
1500 men and a siege train (which was not landed), 
and moved down the James. Gen. Terry was un 
aware of his destination till near Fortress Monroe, 
when Gen. Grant came aboard and directed him to 
take Fort Fisher by storm if he thought best ; if not, 
by siege. 

The expedition left Fortress Monroe, Jan. 6, 1865 : 
put into Beaufort, N. C., on the 8th, and was detained 



Volunteer Infantry. uj 

there by bad weather. On the i2th they arrived off 
Fort Fisher and landed early in the morning under a 
heavy fire from Porter s fleet. At three o clock about 
8,000 troops, with marines, had landed, having three 
days rations in their haversacks and about sixty 
rounds of ammunition to each man. Intrenching 
tools, munitions, &c., were landed in spite of the 
heavy surf that rolled upon the beach. Gen. Terry s 
first concern was to throw a strong defensive line 
across the peninsula whereon Fort Fisher stands, so 
as to isolate it from all support and enable him to 
hold his ground against any force the rebels might 
send down from Wilmington. Some little time was 
spent in getting the troops in the right position. 
The line advanced to within 600 yards of the fort, and 
had determined upon an assault the next day (Jan. 14). 
The iron-clads began their work of destruction, and 
so true were their shots that ere long the gunners in 
Fort Fisher were driven into their bomb-proofs, thus 
silencing their guns. Meanwhile, about 2,000 sailors 
and marines, armed with cutlasses, revolvers and 
guns, had been detailed from the fleet and landed to 
take their hand in the meditated assault. They had 
worked their way up on the beach by digging ditches 
for a cover, till they were within 200 yards of the 
fort, and lay down anxiously awaiting the order to 
charge. This order was given at a quarter past three. 
The fleet was, of course, obliged to change the direc- 



Ii6 Sixth Connecticut 

tion of their fire, so that our forces might not get the 
shelling which was intended for the rebels. This 
gave the enemy a chance again to work their guns, 
and, seeing the marines and sailors advancing they 
poured grape and shrapnel into their ranks fearfully, 
while the musketry kept up a steady fire, mowing 
them down with great slaughter ; and, although al 
most annihilated, they pressed on, and some actually 
gained the parapet. But the sailors assault was sig 
nally repulsed and they were obliged to retire. The 
brigades leading the assault in the other directions 
were more successful, although for a time it seemed 
almost impossible to stand up under such a withering 
fire. The rebels met the charge with a prolonged 
yell and a simultaneous fire. The division under 
Gen. Ames, consisting of three brigades, rushed for 
ward, and the fighting was at close quarters. The 
rebel s fire told fearfully in the Union ranks, and men 
were swept away in winrows. Yet on they pressed, 
almost exhausted, when Gen. Terry sent for Abbott s 
brigade, with the old Sixth and Seventh regiments. 
They pressed the foe in close quarters, while they (the 
rebels) relinquished foot by foot their possession. 
Gen. Terry sprang to the head of the advancing col 
umn, cheering the troops by his presence, and with 
redoubled effort the whole line advanced with a yell 
and the frightened rebels fell back in dismay, while 
the Union forces invested the Fort, and victory was 



Volunteer Infantry. 

ours. The Union cheers were by no means faint at 
this achievement which had crowned their arms, and 
Gen. Terry became the hero of the hour. 

The capture of the stronghold was not effected 
without severe loss to our forces. The gallant sailors 
and marines suffered most, as their advance up the 
beach was opposed with the deadliest fire. The loss 
of the Sixth was small, considering the part they took 
in the engagement. The rebels immediately surren 
dered to Gen. Terry, numbering, all told, 2,083 men, 
169 heavy guns, besides about 2,000 small arms, with 
considerable ammunition and other stores. The 
Union loss in this battle figured up to no killed and 
536 wounded. A sad calamity happened the next 
morning in the Fort. While some of the troops were 
inspecting the chief magazine, it was supposed that 
some loose powder lay on the floor which was ignited 
by the shoes of the soldiers coming in contact. A 
tremendous explosion followed, in which 200 of our 
troops were instantly killed and about 100 more were 
wounded. This sad event cast a gloom over the vic 
torious army, as those brave men who had stood in 
the fore-front of many a hard fought battle, and just 
as victory had once more crowned their efforts, to be 
thus suddenly hurried into eternity was indeed sick 
ening. 

By the capture of Fort Fisher the navy also cap 
tured five blockade runners which were unable to get 



n8 Sixth Connecticut 

away. Part of the enemy retreated across Cape Fear 
river to Smithfield, but, fearing an advance of the 
Union forces, they blew up their magazines, deserted 
their works and fled toward Wilmington. The army 
of the Union did not rest at this point, but imme 
diately advanced to press the retreating rebels. The 
Sixth pushed rapidly forward, skirmishing with the 
rear guard, and on the 226. of February our forces 
entered Wilmington in triumph, and drove the rebels 
in confusion through the city. They fled in the great 
est haste, scattering their blankets and knapsacks on 
the way, but were so closely pursued by the Sixth 
and other regiments that they had no chance to form 
for battle till near the outskirts of the city, where they 
determined to make one more stand. Although they 
were stubborn, they were finally forced to yield and 
made their escape across North East river. 

The Sixth remained in the city of Wilmington one 
night, when they were ordered across Cape Fear river 
to Smithville, where their stay was also brief; they 
soon returned to Wilmington again, where Captain 
Buckbee of the Sixth was detailed as A. A. C. M., 
and remained there some time. The Sixth only re 
mained in Wilmington for a short time and was 
thence transferred to Goldsboro, N. C., where they 
spent the summer months engaged in patrol and 
picket duties. The regiment was here when the 
news came of the surrender of Lee s army, and great 



Volunteer Infantry. 

rejoicing was indulged in by the men at the prospect 
of the termination of the war. The Sixth was or 
dered to Raleigh for muster out, and from thence went 
to Petersburg and took cars for City Point, Va., 
where they embarked for home, after nearly four years 
of active service. 

Lieut. Col. Daniel Klein arrived in New Haven 
with the old Sixth on the 28th of July, 1865, where 
they had an enthusiastic reception tendered them by 
the citizens and military. Ex-Mayor Morris Tyler 
addressed a welcome to the returned soldiers, which 
was briefly responded to by Lieut. Col. Klein. The 
final muster-out did not occur till the 2ist of August, 
when the men were paid off and dismissed. 

Thus was ended the organization of the Sixth, a 
regiment who volunteered early in the war and re 
mained till the close. All through the war for the 
Union the upholders of the National Cause were 
more or less exposed to extraordinary hardships and 
sufferings because of the many densely wooded and 
sparsely peopled regions over which they generally 
marched and fought. All soldiers were more or less 
acquainted with the marshy spots of ground that 
served for a bed at night after a hard day s battle or 
march, and but few arose in the morning without pain 
racking some part of the body from the effects of such 
exposure, and yet a large share survived the conflict 
and returned home to their friends. 



I2O Sixth Connecticut 

One of the most cheering thoughts experienced by 
the soldier in the field was the fact that his friends at 
home cherished and loved him, and proved their 
affection by their prayers and sympathy ; and the let 
ter sent from home containing perhaps but a few 
words traced by the hand of affection, and the simple 
wish expressed for his safe return, mingled with the 
" God bless and keep you," did more to encourage 
the soldier to endure the hardships and privations 
than all the promotions that could be offered. He 
could work better, struggle harder, and fight with a 
purer zeal, if he could but realize that the prayers of 
affection, sympathy and love went up to the great 
Commander of the universe for his safety. The 
members of the Sixth enjoyed the confidence of all the 
corps and division commanders under whose leader 
ship they were chanced to be placed, and in many 
difficult and trying places the old regiment was called 
upon to aid the enterprise. They always strove to 
acquit themselves like men, and true soldiers of the 
Union, never allowing a victory, however great, to 
elate us too much, knowing full well the great sacri 
fice of life it ofttimes cost to gain it ; nor would we 
allow a defeat, however disastrous, to shake our faith 
in the righteousness of the cause in which we were 
engaged ; but, humbly trusting in Divine Providence 
to lead the army to battle for the cause of liberty and 
equality to all in our country. 



Volunteer Infantry. 121 

We would not forget those who went forth at the 
Nation s call, eager to do battle for the right and 
to shield their loved ones against an invasion of the 
foe. We would speak with reverence of those who 
did not return with us from the field; heroes are they, 
leaders on field and staff, leaders in line and rank, 
they offered up their lives for the country s good. 
They sealed their patriotism with their blood ; many 
of them unknown to fame, fell amid the strife, not 
with their names emblazoned high as great com 
manders of the corps, yet they fill honored and pat 
riotic graves, and the surviving members of the Sixth 
cherish their memory. The dead of the Sixth sleep 
in Washington, as well as in the sandy soil of the 
Carolinas. The palmetto groves and the jungles of 
Georgia, together with the river banks of Florida 
and the soil of Virginia hold the ashes of those who 
will ever be sacred to our memory. They have passed 
from our sight; their mission has been accomplished, 
and many long years will elapse ere we can forget 
our departed heroes. We would offer a prayer for the 
widow and the fatherless, that He would temper the 
winds to the shorn lamb, and that His infinite good 
ness may be round and about them in all their heart 
sorrows and afflictions, and that they may be united 
again in that better world when the Master shall call. 



122 Sixth Connecitci*, 



APPENDIX. 



The members of the Sixth always entertained and 
cherished a feeling of deep friendship for one another, 
and when we were discharged it seemed like break 
ing up a household, so closely were our sympathies 
united; and it was resolved to organize an association, 
at no distant day, to perpetuate and keep alive those 
friendly interests which united us so closely during 
the dark days of the war. Therefore, pursuant to a 
call, the members of the Sixth assembled at the old 
State House in New Haven, on the i6th of May, 1868. 
The meeting was called to order by Brigadier Gen 
eral Alfred P. Rockwell, who stated that the object 
of our assembling together was to keep alive and 
fondly cherish the varied memories of the service, to 
perpetuate the friendly relations established in the 
jfield, and also to preserve a record of the regiment. 
By a vote of the members present the following were 
appointed to draft the articles of the Association : 



Volunteer Infantry. 123 

Brig. Gen. ALFRED P. ROCKWELL, New Haven. 
Lieut. RUDOLPH KOST, Bridgeport. 
Sergeant ANDREW PAUL, Waterbury. 

" GEORGE A. STAPLES, Bridgeport. 
Com. Sergt. FRED. E. CALLENDER, New Britain. 

The committee reported that the organization 
should be called the "Association of the Sixth Regi 
ment of Connecticut Volunteers," and the member 
ship to consist of all honorably discharged soldiers 
who had served with the Sixth. The officers of the 
association were to consist of a President, ten Vice 
Presidents (one from each company), a secretary, who 
should also be Treasurer, and a Regimental Histo 
rian. The President, Secretary and three Vice Presi 
dents shall constitute the executive committee for 
the transaction of business. The ballot was taken, 
and the choice of officers for one year resulted as 
follows : 

For Pres., Sergt. GEO. A. STAPLES, Bridgeport. 
For Sec. and Treas., AUGUSTUS F. BULL, New Haven. 
For Historian, CHARLES K. CADWELL, " 

The Vice Presidents were chosen, one from each 
company, and the association voted that the Annual 
Reunion be held on the second Wednesday of Sep 
tember in each year, and the first Annual to be held 
on Sept. 9, 1868, at Bridgeport, Conn. After the 



124 Sixth Connecticut 

usual hand-shaking and congratulations, the associa 
tion adjourned. 

The association met in Bridgeport, according to 
agreement, and enjoyed the hospitality of the soldiers 
friends, and at this our first annual the soldiers were 
extremely gratified to find so much interest taken in 
these Reunions. Many who were unable to be pres 
ent wrote us encouraging letters, and we voted that 
these reunions should be maintained. On motion it 
was voted that the regiment contribute towards a 
proposed monument for our lamented Col. Chatfield, 
that the regiment should give its pledge for $500, 
and that a collection be taken at each of our reunions 
for this object. Edwin L. Cook, of Waterbury, was 
elected treasurer of the monument fund. 

The second Annual of the regiment was held in 
Stamford, Conn. On arriving at the depot we were 
met by delegates of the resident members and took 
carriages to Shippan Point, where we sat down to an 
old-fashioned clam bake. 

The third Annual was held again at Bridgeport, 
where the loyal people of that patriotic town again 
welcomed the old Sixth, and provided an abundant 
repast. 

The fourth Annual was held in New Britain, and a 
splendid reception awaited us. A large part of the 
houses were festooned with flags ; business was gen 
erally suspended ; the regiment was welcomed by the 



Volunteer Infantry. 125 

Mayor and invited to partake of the hospitalities of 
the city. Our faithful Secretary came about 200 miles 
to attend this reunion ; and, as business engagements 
pressed upon him he felt obliged to tender his resig 
nation. A hearty vote of thanks was given him for 
his services, and his resignation reluctantly accepted. 
Wm. F. Smith, of New Haven, was the unanimous 
choice for the vacancy, and was duly elected. 

Our fifth Annual was held in Waterbury, Conn., 
the home of Col. Chatfield. Here, also, the regiment 
met with a grand reception. At the depot the Chat- 
field and Sedgwick Guards met and escorted us to 
Chatfield Armory, where our business meeting was 
held, after which the regiment sat down to a bountiful 
dinner in the City Hall. In the afternoon the regi 
ment marched to Riverside Cemetery, with the guards 
and the Masonic fraternity, where the base of the 
monument of Col. Chatfield was laid, under the au 
spices of Clark Commandery, K. T. 

The sixth Annual was held in New Haven, Conn. 
The visiting comrades were met at the depot and es 
corted to G. A. R. Hall, where the business meeting 
was held, and then after a short march we proceeded 
to Loomis Hall, where the comrades were made wel 
come to the viands before them. A large and beau 
tiful flag was here shown to the regiment, which had 
been purchased with funds raised for that purpose 
at our last Reunion. 



126 Sixth Connecticut 

The seventh Annual was held at Bridgeport, Conn., 
and the members proceeded to Sharpshooter s Park, 
East Bridgeport, where they were finely entertained 
by the resident members and the citizens. It is the 
intention to hold these Reunions every year as long 
as the members live, and to extend a cordial welcome 
to all friends of the old Sixth to meet with us, have a 
hearty hand-shake, revive old friendships, and per 
petuate those fraternal feelings that so closely united 
us on the field. 



ROSTER 



OF THE 



SIXTH REGIMENT, 

Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 

Wd Wounded. 

M. O Mustered Out. 

Res., Resigned. 

Re-en., Re-enlisted. 

Disch., Discharged. 

Tr., Transferred. 

Dis Disabled. 

Vet., Veteran. 

Pro., Promoted. 



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Volunteer Infantry 143 



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Portland. 


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Clark, John, 


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Searles, Edwan 
Searles, George 



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Edward Ortman, 


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Ireland, Henry C., 
Johnson, William, 


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Lyon, Edward H., 
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Monroe, Alanson, 



Volunteer Infantry. 203 

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2d Lieutenant. 

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Wilson Eddy, 
Merritt L. Potter, 
Corporals. 


W. W. Perkins, 
Wm. L. Williams, 
Edwin J. Hickox, 
Henry H. Hurlburt, 
Agustus F. Bull, 



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Volunteer Infantry. 



211 



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213 



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Volunteer Infantry. 



215 





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216 



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Aberton, Geo. A., 


Anderson, Chas., 


Bradley, Chas., 
Brano, Carlos, 


Brann, Theodore, 
Buttrer, Fred., 


Brown, Wm. O., 
Baker, William, 


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Gary, Dennis, 


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ROLL OF HONOR. 



Names. General Remarks. 

ABBOTT, EDWIN H., Died in Service. 

ABBOTT, WOOLSEY, Died in Prison. 

ACKERMAN, CARL, Killed in Battle. 
ALLEN, HENRY, " " " 

ALLEN, LEWIS C. JR., CAPTAIN, Died in Service. 

ATWATER, FRANKLIN J., Died of Wounds. 

BABCOCK, ANSON E., Died in Service. 

BODGE, GEORGE E., Killed in Battle. 
BAKER, JOSEPH, " " " 

BAKER, GEORGE H., Died in Service. 

BALDWIN, BRUCE, Died of Wounds. 

BALDWIN, HENRY M., Died in Service. 

BARNES, SETH E., Died of Wounds. 

BARNES, SETH J., Died in Service. 

BARTLETT, HALSEY, Killed in Battle. 

BARTON, GEORGE A., Died in Service. 

BELCHMER, CHRISTOPHER, Killed in Battle. 
BEMUS, HENRY, " " " 

BENNETT, EDWARD, " " " 

BETHKA, CHARLES, " " " 



222 



Sixth Connecticut 



BEYER, MARTIN, Killed in Battle. 

BING, EDWARD J., Died in Service. 

BLENEL, VALENTINE, Killed in Battle. 

BOSWORTH, D. H., Died in Service. 

BRADLEY, WM. T M ist LIEUT., Died of Wounds. 

BRANDT, HENRY S., 

BROOK, JABEZ C., Died in Service. 

BROWN, WILLIAM H., Killed in Battle. 

BRYSEN, FRANK, Died of Wounds. 

BRYSEN, DAVID, JR., Died in Service. 

BULKLEY, FREDERICK O., 

BUTLER, JESSE, Killed in Battle. 

BYXBEE, JOHN, Died in Service. 

CHATFIELD, JOHN L., COLONEL, Died of Wounds. 

COBBE, GEORGE W., Died in Service. 

COOK, HENRY A., 

COLLETT, ANATOLE, Killed in Battle. 

COLLETT, JAMES, 

CRUSINS, OSCAR, Died of Wounds. 

COREY, WILLIAM H., Killed in Battle. 

CONNELY, PATRICK, Died in Service. 

DAVIS, LUTHER, 

DAWLEY, JAMES, 

DAY, JOHN W., 

DEBOUGE, GUSTAVE, Killed in Battle. 

DEARY, PATRICK, Died in Prison. 

DELPT, HARRY, Killed in Battle. 

DEWITT, WILLIAM, 



Volunteer Infantry. 



223 



DORMAN, HORACE, Died in Service. 

DORMAN, ANDREW, 

DOYLE, JAMES, Killed in Battle. 

DRISCOLL, JOHN F., 

DUPAY, JEROME, 

DUBOIS, CHARLES, Died of Wounds. 

EATON, HORATIO D., CAPTAIN, Killed in Battle. 

FREEMAN, DANIEL, Died in Service. 

FRISBEY, HENRY D., 

GAGE, ROBERT B., Killed in Battle. 

GANGLOFF, CHARLES, 

GERRISH, HENRY G., CAPTAIN, Died in Service. 

GIBBONS, THEODORE, 

GINDER, BALTHASER, 

GILBERT, JAMES H., 

GLISSMAN, WILLIAM, Killed in Battle. 

GOB, CHARLES, 

GRISWOLD, EUGENE W., 

GROGAN, CHARLES H., Died of Wounds. 

GUSSMAN, WILLIAM, 

HALLER, MARTIN, Died of Wounds. 

HAMMOND, CLOVIS E., ist LIEUT., 

HART, WILLIS A., Died in Service. 

HAYWARD, NAHUM L., 

HAUSSERMAN, MICHAEL, 

HENNINGER, GEORGE, Killed in Battle. 

HESSE, AUGUSTUS, 

HESSERICK. EMIL, Died in Service. 



224 



Sixth Connecticut 



HEYNE, PAUL, Killed in Battle. 

HICKOX, EDWIN J., Died in Service. 

HILL, CHARLES T., 

HILL, WARREN F., 

HILLS, SEBURY D., " Prison. 

HOAR, DELBERT, Killed in Battle. 

HODGE, HORACE, Died in Service. 

HOLLER, MARTIN, Died of Wounds. 

HOYT, HENRY W., 

INGALLS, DEXTER W., 

JONES, IRA D., 

JONES, JOSEPH, 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM H., 2d LIEUT., 

JOHNSON, THOMAS, Killed in Battle, 

KREITLING, ALBERT, Died in Service. 

KEITH, CHARLES S., Killed in Battle. 

KELTERER, GEORGE, Died in Prison. 

KIMBERLY, HENRY, Killed in Battle. 

KIRSTEN, CHARLES, Died of Wounds. 

LACEY, WILLIAM S., Died in Service. 

LANERGHAM, LANKE H., Killed in Battle. 

LAWRENCE, JOSEPH C., Died in Service. 

LINTON, JAMES, Killed in Battle. 

LOMBERTI, CHARLES, Died of Wounds. 

MACK, FRANK, Died in Service. 

MALONE, JAMES, Killed in Battle. 

MATTHEWS, DANIEL, 

MAYER, JACOB, Died in Service. 



Volunteer Infantry. 



225 



MASCHMEYER, EDWARD, 
MASCHMEYER, WILLIAM, 
MESSIER, CHARLES, 
McCHINE, HUGH, JR., 
McKENZIE, PATRICK, 
McKINNEY, JAMES, 
McINRO, THOMAS, 
MILLARD, THERON, 
MILNER, WILLIAM, 
MORRIS, THEODORE, 
MOREHOUSE, WM. A., 
MOSES, HENRY, 
O CONNER, THOMAS, 
OSTMAN, WILLARD, 
PALMER, DAVID C., 
PECK, ROBERT C., 
PECK, JOHN W., 
PEET, GEORGE B., 
PERKINS, WILLIAM W., 
PHALEN, TIMOTHY A., 
PHILLIPS, ALONZO, 
PHILLIPS, THEODORE, 
PICKER, PATSEY, 
PUFFER, REUBEN S., 
QUINN, JAMES, 
RAY, JAMES, 
RECOIR, JOHN H., 
RECOIR, PHILLIP H., 



Died in Service. 

Killed in Battle. 
Died of Wounds. 
Died in Service. 
Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 

Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 
Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 



Wd. and died in Prison, 
Died in Service. 
Died of Wounds. 
" in Service. 

" of Wounds. 


Died in Service. 
Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 
Died of Wounds. 
Died in Service. 



226 



Sixth Connecticut 



REED, WILLIAM, 
REEVES, WILLIAM M., 
RILEY, CHARLES, 
RINGE, HENRY, 
ROBBINS, RALPH G., 
ROBINSON, THEODORE T., 
ROGERS, EDMOND, 
ROOT, CALEB B., 
ROYCE, CHARLES B. 
SAGE, ELISHA, 
SCHMIDT, GUSTAVE, 
SCHOFIELD, THEODORE C., 
SCHOFIELD, WILLIAM, 
SHULTZ, WILLIAM, 
SEELEY, JOHN, 
SHAW, JOSEPH L., 
SHEPARD, DAVID G., 
SMITH, OSCAR L., 
SOBY, WILLIAM, 
SPENCER, EDWIN W., 
STAGEY, ALBERT, 
STARK, MICHAEL, 
STEVENS, S. S., 2d LIEUT., 
STINELL, HERMAN, 
SOUTHERGILL, GEORGE, 
TAYLOR, E. B., 
TAYLOR, THOMAS, 
TALMADGE, FRED. A., 



Died of Wounds. 
Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 
Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 

Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 
Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 
Died of Wounds. 
Died in Service. 



Killed in Battle. 
Died in Service. 
Killed in Battle. 
Died of Wounds. 



Killed in Battle. 


Died of Wounds. 
Died in Service. 



Volunteer Infantry. 227 



TOUSLEY, ARTEMUS, Died of Wounds. 

TRACY, THOMAS E., Died in Service. 

TSCHUMME, CONRAD, JR., 

VAILLE, JOHN R., 

VOLKMAN, FERDINAND, 

WARNER, GEORGE, Died of Wounds. 

WATERMIRE, FREDERICK, Died in Service. 

WATERS, HENRY W., 

WHITE, FRANK, Killed in Battle. 

WEEKS, ALPHONSO, Died in Service. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN, 

WILCOX, JAY P., CAPTAIN. Killed in Battle. 

WIND, GEORGE A., Died in Service. 

WOODFORD, EDGAR M., 

WOODS, JOHN, Killed in Battle. 

WOOSTER, JOSEPH A., JR., Died of Wounds. 



NOTE. No account is rendered of those returned as "Missing," 
and "Supposed KvHed." 



CASUALTIES OF THE SIXTH. 



Killed in Action, ...... 43 

Died of Wounds, ..... 46 

Died of Disease, ...... 119 

Discharged prior to muster out of Regiment, . 666 

Missing at date of muster out of Regiment. . .23 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 
BERKELEY 

Return to desk from which borrowed. 
This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. 



JUN 8 f 1952 

INTER-LIBRARY 

jun23 52HN ! 



AUG21 19755 



ret cm. 



FFB 2 1997 

0. C. BERKELEY 



LOAN 



LD 21-95m-ll, 50(2877sl6)476 



YB 44905 




M205562 






C 3 

THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY